Posts Published in August 2012

Samsung Galaxy Camera to Come with a Free 50GB Dropbox Account

Samsung’s new Galaxy Camera will be the first point-and-shoot to which you can add a 3G or 4G data plan when it arrives on store shelves in October. One of the major benefits of being connected to the Internet all the time is that the camera will be able to take full advantage of cloud-based services. Services like Dropbox.

Samsung confirmed today that customers who purchase a Galaxy camera will automatically receive a free 50GB Dropbox cloud storage account — the same perk currently offered to some Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone buyers.
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Adobe Says Retina Support is Coming to Photoshop CS6 and Lightroom 4

New uber-high-resolution HiDPI displays like Apple’s Retina display are amazing to look at, but aren’t very useful unless 3rd party software makers optimize their programs to support the technology. If you’re a photographer that has already shelled out a few G’s on a Retina-equipped Macbook Pro, you’re probably disappointed with the fact that Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom aren’t optimized for the display. In fact, some photographers are finding the display unusable for professional photo editing due to the difference in detail between apps optimized for Retina and those that aren’t.

If that’s you, Adobe’s announcement today will be music to your ears: Photoshop CS6 will support HiDPI displays in the next few months, and Lightroom 4 support is on the way as well.
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Supercut of One-Point Perspective Shots from Stanley Kubrick Films

A one-point perspective photograph is one in which there exists only a single vanishing point. Parallel lines in the scene all converge on that single point, leading away from the viewer. It can be used for interesting compositions, especially if that vanishing point is placed at the intersection points of the rule of thirds.

Filmmaker Stanley Kubrick has a habit of using one-point perspective for dramatic effect, often with the vanishing point in the dead center of the frame, disorienting the viewer and creating tension for his scenes. Film enthusiast kogonada recently took a bunch of Kubrick films, collected the shots showing this technique, and created the interesting supercut seen above.
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Focus Peaking Making Its Way onto More Digital Cameras

One of the interesting technologies Sony introduced into its line of NEX mirrorless cameras last year (starting with the NEX-C3) was “focus peaking”, a feature from the video recording world that highlights in-focus areas of an image to aid in manual focusing. You know those colorful pixels that image editing programs use to indicate blown out or underexposed areas of photos? It’s like that, except for focus. What’s awesome is that you can adjust things like focus, focal length, and aperture, and then see the depth of field adjust on your screen in real time. Check out the 10-second video above for a demo.
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Nikon D600 Coming Very Soon, May Offer Full Frame for Just $1500

More details are emerging about Nikon’s affordable full frame DSLR, the D600. Nikon Rumors reports that the camera will almost certainly be on display at Photokina next month, which means that the announcement will likely come around the time the show opens on September 18th. The camera is said to offer a full frame sensor at a price previously unseen in the market — possibly as low as $1500. To put that in comparison, Canon’s crop sensor 7D hit the market at $1700 when it was released back in 2009. $1500 for a full frame would be ridiculous and game-changing.
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Instagram Power Users Covering the US Open Alongside Press Photographers

It pays to be a top user on Instagram. In addition to having hundreds of thousands of eyes glued to your stream of photos, marketers for the world’s top brands are constantly trying to think of ways to incorporate you into their advertising campaigns. Case in point: at the US Open this year, there will be three Insta-celebs covering the event alongside the photojournalists from major national media outlets.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Apple Moves One Step Closer Toward Location-Based Camera Disabling

In June of last year, we reported on an unsettling patent filed by Apple that would allow certain infrared signals to remotely disable the camera on iPhones. It showed the potential downsides of bringing cameras into the world of wireless connectivity, which appears to be the next big thing in the camera industry. Now, a newly published patent is rekindling the fears of those who don’t want “Big Brother” controlling their devices.
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Photos of Neatly Arranged Outfits Worn by Characters in Famous Movies

Earlier this week we shared a series of photographs by photographer Dinah Fried showing notable meals found in famous novels. It’s difficult to catch the meals when reading the books, especially if they’re only mentioned once or twice, so major props to you if you recognized more than one or two of the meals.

French photographer Candice Milon‘s project La Mode en Grand Écran, or “Fashion on the Big Screen”, is much more accessible. The series shows famous outfits worn by main characters in well known movies, from the snazzy skater style of Marty McFly in Back to the Future to the droog look worn by characters in The Clockwork Orange. The clothing items are arranged neatly on backgrounds of various colors. See how many you can recognize (answers at the end).
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Make a Film Roll Bandolier to Make Sure You Never Run Out of Shots

Bandoliers are pocketed belts made for holding ammunition. They’re often seen in action and war movies, slung over the chests of tough guys holding big guns. If you’d like to ensure that you never run out of photographic ammo (AKA film) when you’re out and about, you can make yourself a nifty DIY film ammo strap. Photojojo says that these are inspired by old school camera straps that come with elastic film loops, but we definitely think you should go the extra mile and turn them into full-blown bandoliers.

What you’ll need is some fabric and elastic, a key ring to serve as a connector, and some sewing tools and skills. While it’s designed to be attached to your belt or to the strap mount on your camera, adding some extra length to it can turn it into a belt/bandolier. Head on over to Photojojo for the low-down on how to put this thing together!

How to Make a Film Ammo Strap [Photojojo]


P.S. We’ve written multiple times before on how there’s a historical link between guns and cameras. Many techniques are interchangeable, there’s shared terminology, and rifle butts have been used as camera stabilizers throughout history
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The Light Show on CN Tower is Actually a Subliminal Photo Slideshow

If you’ve visited the CN Tower in Toronto, Canada anytime during the past five years at night, you’ve likely enjoyed the dazzling light show that appears on the side of the tower. The 1,330 uber-bright LED lights (which cost a cool $2.5 million) were installed in the elevator shafts back in 2007, and are turned on from dusk every day until 2 the next morning. What you might not have known, however, is that the seemingly random colors that appear are really not so random after all: they’re actually pieces of photographs!
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