Posts Tagged ‘photojournalism’

2013 Pulitzer Prize Winners Announced, All Depict Syrian Civil War

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Columbia University has announced the winning photographs of both the Breaking News and Feature Photography Pulitzer prizes for 2013 — all of which depict the heartrending civil war in Syria. At first glance that may not seem like a big deal, but when you consider that the Breaking News prize wasn’t awarded to one, but five AP photographers jointly, the power of these photos begins to sink in. Read more…

Publishers Need Better Photography to Stay Relevant on the Web

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Magazine and newspaper stories have traditionally revolved around the writer. A writer would pitch stories and was almost always the architect of the piece. When the story needed visuals, a photographer or illustrator would be brought in, often after the story was finished. This order of operations placed the writer in the driver’s seat.

The primacy of the writer was reflected in the leadership of the publication where editors, responsible for direction and content, rose from the ranks of authors. During the nineteenth century, when publications were gray tomes celebrating the written word, this was a perfect arrangement. Artwork accompanied the story, augmented it, clarified it, attracted attention to it, but always served a subordinate role. Photography was the appetizer to the article’s main course — the words.
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Photographer Escapes Afghan Insurgents After Four Months in Captivity

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Being a photojournalist in a war zone is a dangerous job. In addition to the physical hazards of combat photography, there’s always the possibility that you will be kidnapped and taken hostage by insurgents.

Back in August of 2011, Australian freelancer Tracey Shelton had her gear stolen even as she barely managed to evade kidnappers in Libya. Unfortunately, 29-year-old French photojournalist Pierre Borghi wasn’t as lucky. Read more…

Instagram May Soon Turn Paparazzi Into an Endangered Species

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In recent years, photographers — and particularly photojournalists — have had to compete more and more aggressively with the everyday Joe and his smartphone who happens to be at the right place at the right time. And with technologies like CrowdOptic in the works that will help sift through the plethora of photographs taken every second, news agencies may soon be able to find that Joe in record time.

But according to an article by Jenna Wortham of The New York Times, one branch of photography is already taking a significant hit: the paparazzi are being replaced by Instagrammers. Using a recent photo of Beyoncé and her daughter as an example, Wortham shows how the paparazzi are already losing their battler with those same amateurs. Read more…

Photographs of the Poor Filipino Children of “Smokey Mountain” in Manila

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My name is Chris Rusanowsky, I am a 22-year-old freelance photographer based out of Los Angeles, California. In February of 2012 I took a trip to document poverty in Manila, Philippines for 32 days.
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A Photographer’s First Hand Account of the Sandy Hook School Shooting

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On the morning of December 14th, 2012 I found myself scanning the redundant array of social media apps on my phone. Just as I was about to pry myself out of bed, I had come across a recent twitter post by one of my fellow graduates of Newtown High School. In just a few minutes I would learn that my former hometown elementary school had become the site of one of the most horrific school shootings that this country has ever seen.
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World Press Photo-Winning Photographer Accused of Greed Over Album Cover

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Madeleine Corcoran over at Duckrabbit has published a sharp criticism of photojournalist Samuel Aranda‘s decision to license his most famous conflict photo to Canadian electronic band Crystal Castles for use on their album cover and merchandise.
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Photographer Captures an Intimate Look into Life Inside Iran

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New Zealand-based travel photographer Amos Chapple visited Iran on three personal trips between December 2011 and January 2013. While he was there, he photographed the country and its people as he saw them on the ground.
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Triangulation of Attention: Tomorrow’s Instant Photojournalism

A couple of months ago, we spent some time telling you about CrowdOptic, a company that has been pioneering a way to sift through the millions of photos taken every second of every day and separate the “noise” from the “signal” when it comes to finding newsworthy content.

The company’s technology takes advantage of the fact that smartphone photographs today come with both GPS and heading data attached, allowing algorithms to determine not only where a photo was taken, but also what it was taken of. And in the video above, former football player Jim Kovach explains the tech in detail at TEDxSiliconAlley in New York City. Read more…

Bay Area Photojournalists Being Robbed of Their Camera Gear

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Apparently robbers in Northern California are starting to learn that photojournalists typically shoot with pretty expensive gear. The New York Times reports that robbers have been targeting news photographers in recent months, sometimes at gunpoint:

Last August, Laura Oda, chief photographer for The Oakland Tribune, was photographing people painting the mural when she spotted someone in her peripheral vision. “Within seconds they were on me,” she said, “one in front and one in back.” Armed, they pulled cameras off her neck and grabbed her bag of cameras and a laptop from her car.

Three months later, Ms. Oda was photographing cars at a busy intersection when she was again robbed of her camera, at gunpoint once more. For a while, she avoided the streets of Oakland. She has since returned but has established a new rule: she does not stay in one place for more than five minutes.

One veteran photojournalist has already lost five cameras to robbery. Each successful theft nets the robbers between $3,000 to $50,000 in gear — gear that hasn’t been turning up on the secondary market (e.g. craigslist).

In Oakland, Photojournalists Covering Crimes Become the Victims [NYTimes]


Image credit: Oakland Tribune by James Cridland