Posts Tagged ‘composite’

Capturing Both Night and Day in a Single Photograph

Photographer Stephen Wilkes has become well-known for his project titled “Day to Night,” which features single images of various locations that capture the passing of a day. CBS News recently caught up with Wilkes and aired the feature above. In it, the photographer talks about how the project began and walks through how the composite images are shot and created.
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Project Combines Daytime and Nighttime Shots of NYC Into Single Frames

Now here’s a creative idea that we’ve never seen before… For this short film titled New York: Night and Day, New York City-based filmmaker and animator Philip Stockton blended daytime and nighttime images of his city into single shots. He explains,

New York: Night and Day is a combination of non-traditional video time-lapse and animation. I filmed day and night scenes from around New York City and combined them back into single sequences using rotoscoping techniques. The piece explores the relationships between night and day, by compositing together scenes shot in the same location over a time period ranging from 4 – 8 hours. I hope you enjoy it.

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Time-Slice Photo and Video Showing the Very Large Telescope Over One Night

Inspired by photographer Richard Silver’s time-slice photos that we featured last month, European Southern Observatory Fellow Gabriel Brammer decided to do the same thing, except with photographs of the ESO’s Very Large Telescope in northern Chile instead of NYC buildings.
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Turn Solid Glass Objects into Liquid by Splashing Some Water

Here’s a fun weekend photo project for you to try: turn solid glass objects into liquid by splashing water onto them. That’s what Mexico City-based photographer Jean Bérard did for his series titled Liquid Glass. He set various glass vessels onto a table, and photographed them multiple times while splashing the water contained within and tossing water on from the outside.

The photographs were then merged into single composite photos that make the objects look like they’re created entirely out of water.
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Hyperphotos That Show Surreal Worlds in Mind-Boggling Detail

Gigapixel photographs are generally created by snapping a large number of photos of a scene using a special robotic camera rig, and then stitching those images together afterward using special software. Jean-François Rauzier creates similarly massive images, except his “hyperphotos” are all stitched together by hand.
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12.5 Years of Daily Self-Portraits Averaged into a Single Photograph

Earlier this month, Noah Kalina released an updated version of his everyday self-portrait time-lapse video, showing how his face changed over more than a decade. The video spans 12 years and 5 months, containing over 4,500 daily photos of Kalina’s face shot from the same angle and perspective.

Than Tibbetts wanted to see what the entire project would look like as a single frame, so he used FFmpeg to extract the frames from the video and ImageMagick to average them. The resulting image, seen above, shows how consistent Kalina was with his self-portraits over the years.

Average Noah Kalina [Thanland via kottke.org]


P.S. Last year, designer Tiemen Rapati did the same thing with 500 of clickflashwhirr’s daily self-portraits. That one turned out even better than this one.

Ghostly Buildings Created by Combining Before and After Photos of Demolitions

Philadelphia-based architect and photo enthusiast Andrew Evans has an interesting series of photographs titled Demolition Composites, which contains photographs of ghostly buildings spotted around the City of Brotherly Love. The technique used to create them is extremely basic. Evans took photographs of the buildings, and then rephotographed the same location after the building had been demolished (cleared away for new construction projects).

By compositing the before and after photographs together, Evans ended up with images that offer a final, fading look at the beautiful buildings that once occupied the new construction sites.
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This is What You Get When You Stack Photos of a Meteor Shower

Capturing a single shooting star can make for a brilliant photograph, but what does it look like if you composite multiple meteors into a single image? Fort Collins, Colorado-based nature photographer David Kingham decided to find out recently during the ongoing Perseid meteor shower. The amazing photo seen above is what resulted.
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Disorienting Composite Photos Showing Interior Spaces from Below

A couple months ago we shared a creative photo project that showed various interior spaces from directly overhead, as if they were photographed by a fly on the ceiling. German photographer Michael H. Rohde has a similar project, except his photographs are shot from the opposite direction: directly below.
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Composite Photos of Tourists Watching Nuclear Explosions

tourists watching nuclear explosions

Atomic Overlook is a startling series of images by photographer Clay Lipsky that shows tourists enjoying the beauty of mushroom clouds at atomic bomb tests. Lipsky writes,

Imagine if the advent of the atomic era occurred during today’s information age. Tourists would gather to view bomb tests, at the “safe” distances used in the 1950’s, and share the resulting cell phone photos online.

Lipsky created the images by combining photos taken during his travels over the last 8 years with photographs of nuclear bomb blasts.
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