lawenforcement

Photographer Robert Frank Was Jailed for Being ‘Suspicious’ in 1955

Photographers are often viewed with suspicion by police, and there are regular headlines about people being harassed and detained for simply shooting photos. However, being stopped by police for this type of "suspicious" behavior is not an issue unique to the digital age. Renowned photographer Robert Frank was even jailed for three days while driving through Arkansas in 1955 as he shot his famous photo book The Americans.

Are Your Social Media Photos Ending Up In a Law Enforcement Database?

Facial recognition is an incredibly useful consumer tool for organizing our burgeoning photo albums. Companies like Google and Apple have slowly integrated machine learning algorithms into their consumer photo products, which allow you to search by keywords without the need for manual tagging, or to simply click on a face to see more photos of that person.

Britain’s Biggest Speed Camera Uses a Canon 100-400mm Lens

Gloucestershire police have unveiled Britain's biggest speed camera. Called the A417, the portable camera can catch drivers violating laws from roughly 1,000 meters or about 3/5 of a mile. And on the front of the camera is a Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS telephoto zoom lens.

Photographer Sues Cop Who Shot Him After Mistaking Camera for Gun

Back in September, Ohio photojournalist Andy Grimm was shot by a sheriff's deputy while photographing a traffic stop -- it turned out that the cop had mistaken Grimm's camera and tripod for a gun and decided to shoot first and look more closely later. Grimm is now filing a civil rights lawsuit against the officer and the city.

I’ve Been Stopped Over 20 Times by Police for Having a Camera and Tripod

Recently I've been trying to get better at bracketing, where you take overexposed and underexposed photos and then merge them together. It can create a very neat effect when done correctly. It can also be abused, as many photographers tend to do, which results in unrealistic looking photography.

A few days ago, I was out playing with this feature in my hometown of Cheswick, Pennsylvania, to better understand it when I was stopped by police.