Posts Tagged ‘sandisk’

Deal Alert: Get SanDisk 32 and 64GB SDXC Extreme Class 10 Cards at Steep Discounts

SanDiskDealAlertSDXCCards

Today only, B&H is offering a rather nice deal on two of their 32 and 64GB SanDisk SDXC Extreme Class 10 SD cards. With maximum write speeds of 45MB/s, they’re a great option to have as either your main memory solution, or a back-up in bodies with dual card slots. Read more…

SanDisk Announces Huge Capacity 128GB microSD Card

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Yesterday, SanDisk unveiled the newest addition to its Secure Digital memory card lineup: a 128GB microSDXC card that effectively doubles the storage capabilities of the current generation of cards.

And while the practicality of that much storage on a microSD card isn’t overly exciting for most photographers, there are certainly some scenarios where this will be beneficial. Read more…

SanDisk’s New CFast 2.0 Card Clocks in as the World’s Fastest Memory Card

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SanDisk made it clear last September that it would not be pursuing the XQD memory card format, but instead would focus its energies on CFast 2.0, the then newly-announced high-speed CompactFlash spec.

Almost a year later, SanDisk has finally debuted the fruits of that decision: a card that is both the world’s first CFast 2.0 card, and the world’s fastest memory card of any kind. Read more…

Beware Counterfeit Memory Cards Being Shipped From Amazon Warehouses

Check out the two memory cards above. One of them is a counterfeit card while the other is a genuine one. Can you tell which is which? If you can’t, we don’t blame you. Japan-based photography enthusiast Damien Douxchamps couldn’t either until he popped the fake card into his camera and began shooting. The card felt a bit sluggish, so he ran some tests on his computer. Turned out the 60MB/s card was actually slower than his old 45MB/s card.

While it’s not unusual to come across counterfeit memory cards — it’s estimated that 1/3 of “SanDisk”-labeled cards are — what’s a bit concerning is how Douxchamps purchased his: he ordered the cards off Amazon — cards that were “fulfilled by Amazon.”
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XQD a No-Show at Photokina, SanDisk Opts to Avoid the Format

When XQD memory cards were announced in December 2011, the CompactFlash Association touted the format as the successor to CompactFlash cards. We definitely seemed to be moving in that direction at first: one month after the unveiling, Nikon’s flagship D4 DSLR was announced with XQD card support. The day after that, Sony became the first major memory card maker to announce a line of XQD cards. Six months later, Lexar also announced its intentions to join the party.

Since then, things have died down to the point where you can hear grasshoppers chirping. Not a single XQD-capable camera was announced at Photokina 2012 this past week. Despite being the first to make them, Sony strangely decided to leave the cards out of its top-of-the-line cameras as well.
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SanDisk and Lexar Not Planning to Jump Into the XQD Game Anytime Soon

At the end of last year a new format called XQD was unveiled as the eventual replacement for CompactFlash. About a month later at CES 2012, Sony announced the first XQD cards. If you’re not sold on the new format, here’s some good news for you: Lexar and SanDisk have both announced that they have no plans to release XQD cards in the near future and that they’re both committed to the CompactFlash format (a bit strange though, given that SanDisk was one of the companies that announced XQD in November 2010). Lexar’s actions certainly back up its words: at CES it unveiled its largest (256GB) and fastest (1000x) CompactFlash cards ever.

(via PhotographyBlog)


Image credit: 22 GB of wedding photos by John Carleton

Insane Discounts on SanDisk Compact Flash Cards at B&H

Update: The deal prices seem to be fluctuating. They might not be what our screenshot shows.


In the market for memory cards? B&H is currently offering SanDisk Compact Flash cards at crazy prices. They’re listing Extreme Pro cards at less than 50% of the price offered at other retailers. For example, a 16GB Extreme Pro card currently costs $60 (with free shipping in the US) from B&H but $130+ at most other places.

SanDisk Compact Flash Cards [B&H Photo Video]


Thanks for sending in the tip, Tyler!

SanDisk Memory Vault Drive Designed to Help Your Photos Outlive You

According to a survey conducted for SanDisk, 64% of adults in the US wouldn’t consider destroying their photo collections for $1 million. At the same time, the general public probably doesn’t spend nearly enough time and money ensuring the safety of those same photos. Well, SanDisk announced a new product today designed to help photos last at least as long as their owners do. It’s called the “Memory Vault”, and is a rugged flash drive that has the proven ability to preserve data uncorrupted — a big problem for ordinary hard drives — for up to 100 years. 8GB of storage will cost you $50, while 16GB is priced at $80.

SanDisk Memory Vault [SanDisk]

SanDisk and Eye-Fi Join Forces to Offer Wireless SD Goodness in Europe

Last week Toshiba announced “FlashAir” SD card with built-in LAN functionality, and today SanDisk is launching a counterattack. Rather than develop its own wireless cards, the company is partnering with Eye-Fi to sell co-branded wireless SD cards to European customers. The cards, which allow photos to be transfered to a computer over Wi-Fi, will be available in 4GB and 8GB sizes, and are basically Eye-Fi cards with a SanDisk logo slapped onto them. No word on price or release date as of yet.

It looks like wireless memory cards are going to be one of the next big things in digital photography as more and more big players are hopping onto the bandwagon.

(via Eye-Fi via MegaPixel)

One-Third of the SanDisk Memory Cards on Earth are Counterfeit

Did you know that a third of the SanDisk memory cards being used on Earth are actually fake? A SanDisk engineer recently shared this startling fact with a reader over at The Online Photographer:

[...] at any given time, approximately a third of the SanDisk memory cards (made by Toshiba) being used out there in the world are counterfeit. As in, not SanDisk memory cards at all—some other kind of cards dressed up as lookalikes.

Thirty percent, was the number quoted. A third, more or less.

To make sure you’re getting the real thing, always purchase your memory cards from reputable dealers.
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