Posts Tagged ‘lightfield’

Lytro Opens a Physical Studio Location in Tokyo for Light Field Imaging

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Light field photo studios are now a thing. This morning Lytro launched the world’s first light field imaging studio in Tokyo, Japan.
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Lytro Raises $50M to Shift Focus from Still Photos to Video and Virtual Reality

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Lytro has announced that it just raised $50 million to undergo a “strategic shift” in strategy. Instead of focusing on light field photography and refocusable 3D photos, the company plans to expand into the fields of video and virtual reality. A large number of jobs will be shed during this process.
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Wedding Photos Shot with a Lytro Light Field Camera

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Earlier this month, we shared some sample photos showing how Lytro’s Illum light field camera performed in capturing the NFC Championship game. Here’s another look at the camera with a very different subject matter: wedding photographs.
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Lytro Unveils ‘Focus Spread’, A Feature That Lets You Pinpoint Where Focus Starts and Ends

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Lytro has released Version 4.1 of its desktop light field photo editing software, and one of the main new features is something called “Focus Spread.” It’s a revolutionary feature that takes advantage of Lytro’s “shoot now, focus later” abilities, giving photographers the ability to control where focus starts and stops in a photo.
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Lytro Branches Out from Photography, Offers Unprecedented Access to Their Tech for $20K

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The folks at Lytro have always believed that light field technology is the future, and not just for photography and storytelling. They believe that anything with a lens and a sensor can benefit from the technology, and with today’s announcement of the Lytro Platform, they’re opening up their proprietary tech to anybody who wants to partner up with them and expand light field into new markets. Read more…

Play Around with Refocusable Images from Pelican Imaging’s ‘Light Field’ Camera for Smartphones

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With each passing day, it seems as though light field photography (and its imitators) is becoming more and more ubiquitous. Patents here, rumors there, it’s a conglomeration of what is very likely the next frontier in photography.

And this past week, Pelican Images published a collection of online 3D viewer images captured with its thin light field camera that might be making its way into mobile devices soon. Read more…

Lytro’s Interactive Light Field Images are Now Viewable in Full Glory on 500px

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One of (if not the) main challenges Lytro faces as it attempts to bring light field photography into the mainstream is the fact that there aren’t a lot of places you can actually experience the ‘living’ images where they’re, to use Lytro’s vernacular, alive.

Most places just don’t support viewing of the interactive images, and while Lytro has taken some steps to remedy this in the past, the company just took what amounts to a giant leap. Read more…

Sony Patent Shows Off Its Take on a Light Field Camera, Solves the Low-Res Problem

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The light field photography market may soon get a little more crowded and competitive according to an exciting Sony patent that promises to not simply copy, but improve upon the technology made famous by Lytro. Read more…

Diving Into the Tech Behind the Lytro Illum and Its Impressive 30-250mm f/2.0 Lens

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Lytro came into the photography world not only to create a novelty product, but to fundamentally change how we approach image capture. Because despite light field photography being around for over a century, it’s only with the latest technology that the company is able to exploit what it is a camera is truly capable of doing.

We recently spoke with Lytro about its upcoming Illum camera a bit, diving into the technology behind the specs and revealing how Lytro’s approach is allowing the company to not only step, but leap into the future. Read more…

MIT Project Would Like to Bring Light Field Photography to Every Smartphone

When it comes to technological innovations, the acronym MIT comes up often. Known for their incredible collection of human capital in the form of intellect, The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is constantly pushing the boundaries of what’s capable in every facet of life.

And in the case of a project called “Tesseract,” the boundaries being pushed are those surrounding the field of smartphone camera technology. Read more…