Posts Tagged ‘photoeditor’

Beautiful Short Animation Pays Homage to ‘The Editor’

We try to stay away from sharing video-specific content on PetaPixel because we consider ourselves photo people through and through. And yet, overlap is bound to happen, which is why we couldn’t resist sharing this insightful and artfully crafted animation that pays homage to the work of editors. Read more…

Reuters Global Sports Photo Editor Leaves After Almost 30 Years, Position Eliminated

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Reuters global sports picture editor Gary Hershorn announced yesterday that his position at the agency had been eliminated, and so, starting April 1st, he will no longer be working for the company. Read more…

Nat Geo Photo Editor On Listening to Your Inner Voice and Putting the Photo First

If you’ve ever dreamed of being published in National Geographic — and let’s be honest, a good number of us have fantasized about that career path — then you’re going to want to pay special attention to the short video above.

At the request of Nat Geo photographer and burn magazine editor David Alan Harvey, Nat Geo photo editor Susan Welchman gives you some concise advice on what she’s looking for from her photographers. Read more…

Google Brings Advanced Non-Destructive Photo Editor to Android 4.4 KitKat

Android 4.4 KitKat was officially announced a few days ago, but one of the coolest features (especially for us camera folk) wasn’t mentioned in the announcement at all: an impressive new non-destructive photo editor is built right in. Read more…

How Much Does Sun-Times Media Pay Its Freelance Photographers?

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Want a peek into how much freelance photographers get paid by Sun-Times Media? The issue is one that may be on many a photographers mind after the Chicago Sun-Times decided to fire its entire staff of photographers. Thanks to a “leaked” memo, we now have some idea.
Read more…

A Glimpse Into the Hectic Life of a Reuters Photo Editor at the Olympics

As we shared last week, being a sports photographer at the Olympics is a difficult task: battling a round-the-clock schedule and a sea of competing photographers, hauling around a boatload of gear from venue to venue is just the least of your concerns.

Shooters aren’t the only ones with a difficult job, though: photo editors have it just as bad. Reuters photo editor Russell Boyce has written up a fascinating article that offers a behind-the-scenes look into the responsibilities — and mindset — of a picture editor at the Games.
Read more…

How to Shoot Powerful Portraits of Powerful People

Here’s an hour-long live video interview that Photoshelter recently did with Michele Hadlow, senior photo editor over at Forbes Magazine.

Hadlow speaks on how the magazine has managed to continue commissioning high-profile shoots despite cutbacks common across most publications. Michele tells us about the top characteristics all killer portraits must have to get featured, and what photographers need to succeed with both their subjects and clients.

Michele also discusses how Forbes hires photographers, and what up-and-coming photographers can do to get noticed. Having been at the magazine for over 14 years, Michele speaks to over a decade of work in the industry

(via Photoshelter)

Email by Telegraph Photo Editor Causes Copyright Infringement Stir

After discovering his photograph used without permission on The Telegraph’s website, photographer Jonathan Kent contacted the newspaper asking to be compensated for the unauthorized use. He then received an email from deputy picture editor Matthew Fearn, who defended the newspaper’s actions, stating,

[Due to the] ever-shifting nature of news – in particular with the advent of online publishing – [...] it is not always possible to secure copyright clearance before pictures are published.

Our industry therefore adopts the stance that if a picture has no overwhelming artistic value and if there is no issue of exclusivity (ie it is already being published online or elsewhere) then no reasonable copyright owner will object to its being republished in exchange for a reasonable licence fee. The only alternative to such a stance is not to publish pictures at all unless they come from a commercial library, the available range of which will inevitably be inadequate.

[...] In this instance, and in light of what you have told us, we have no reason to doubt that you are the copyright owner for this picture. However the blog from which it was taken gave no indication as to the copyright owner and no contact details. We therefore used it (in fact we inadvertently used it again for some four hours this morning) in the normal way, which is to say that we were always prepared to pay the industry standard rate.

Fearn has reportedly offered Kent £400 to settle the case, arguing that it is a higher amount than Kent would be awarded by the court.

Telegraph’s picture editor caught in copyright infringement blunder [BJP]


Image credit: journalist by alexgamela

Google to Shutter Its Photo Editor Picnik

To keep itself lean and focused, Google is planning to do some spring cleaning and shut down a number of non-critical projects and services that don’t attract enough attention to keep alive. One of the services marked for termination is Picnik, the online photo editor that Google acquired back in 2010. The service will remain online until April 19, after which the team will be folded into the Google+ team.

(via Engadget)

If Clichés Are So Bad, Why Do So Many of Them Win Contests?

Photo editor Michael Davis on why clichés win photo contests:

I think one of the dynamics at play is that work that was recognized in the past triggers interest in similar work in the present. In other words, we have this library of images in our minds and when we see images that are similar to the images that we think are great, there’s an association, a connection that is positive. These are derivative images. But instead of being a negative aspect, these images get elevated, often to the highest awards and often without realizing we’re just awarding what worked in the past.

That’s the nature of the cliché: I’m photographing a subject that was deemed good in the past, therefore the photo I make today will also be good. As a judge, the perspective is: This type of photo has been recognized in the past, therefore we should recognize it today.

His advice for photographers looking to break free of subjects that have been beaten shot to death? Do the hard work of researching prior work, and think about breaking new ground in either the subject, story, or storytelling method.

If clichés are so bad, why do they win contests? [Michael Davis]


Image credit: Cliche by Tom Newby Photography