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Powerful Decade-Long Photo Project Retraces the Underground Railroad at Night

“Decision to Leave” Magnolia Plantation on the Cane River, Louisiana

“Decision to Leave” Magnolia Plantation on the Cane River, Louisiana

Photographer Jeanine Michna-Bales has dedicated the past decade of her life to researching and documenting the historical locations – both known and shrouded in mystery – that made up the historical Underground Railroad.

The resulting photographs make up her ongoing series Through Darkness to Light, and retrace the dark, unpaved path that thousands of slaves were forced to travel.

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Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photojournalist Takes the iPhone 6 for a Spin

When the New York TimesMolly Wood received two review units of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus from Apple, she wanted to see how they fared in the hands of a truly great photographer. So she shipped the two devices off to trusted NYT photojournalist and Pulitzer Prize winner Todd Heisler.

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external Editing images of ‘hell’, in close-up —AFP

The photo and video editors in Nicosia, AFP’s headquarters for the Middle East and North Africa, have to face a daily flood of unbearable images. It is their job to pore over the images from Syria, from Iraq, Gaza, Libya and other regional hotspots, and decide whether or not to publish them. It is their job to take in, for hours at a stretch each day, images of mutilated bodies, of wounded children screaming in pain, and — more recently — of hostages being beheaded.

 
Oct 01, 2014 · ↬ Via · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Cameras Don’t Break Rules, People Break Rules

Moose

A portrait session that results in the death of the subject should be called a failure.

As reported by the Salt Lake Tribune, a group of photographers and onlookers experienced precisely that level of catastrophic botchery last week in Grand Teton National Park when crowding too close to a moose (not a good idea).

The moose, already agitated by the presence of a nearby bull moose, was scared by the approaching park-visitors and bolted before stumbling over a picnic table and landing on a fire grate. With its hoof caught in the grate, the half-ton animal collapsed and broke its leg so badly that park rangers were forced to put it down. Read more…

Intricately Detailed Concrete Recreations of Iconic Film Cameras

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Artist Alex Stanton has a thing for photography, but he doesn’t actually take any pictures. His obsession with photography is focused on the vintage gear so many of us adore; gear he’s decided to preserve in extreme detail using a mix of concrete, bronze, copper, brass, patina, rust, iron, epoxy. Read more…

external We Are What We Eat: In the Arctic, It’s All About Meat —National Geographic | PROOF

imageedit_31_4404465787In 2013, photographer Matthieu Paley set out on a 4 month, 6 country trek to find the ancestral ties to the food we eat. Beginning his trek through Eastern Greenland’s 3.5 hours of daylight, he discovers the pre-Westernized Arctic Sea bounty.

 
Oct 01, 2014 · ↬ Via · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Fuji X100T Reviewed at the #OccupyCentral Protest in Hong Kong

The recent #occupycentral pro-democratic election protests in Hong Kong have been all over the news the past few days, and so, when it came time to review the new Fuji X100T, DigitalRev TV decided to take to the protest site. Read more…

Sony Confirms ‘Perfume Bottle’ Camera Has Curved Sensor; Is a Curved Sensor RX1 in the Works?

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Sony’s KW1 perfume bottle-themed selfie camera was only interesting to us — as anything more than a novelty — for one unconfirmed reason: claims that it housed Sony’s first ever curved sensor. But, until yesterday, we had no idea whether or not this was true. Read more…

Curious Baby Owls Investigate a Camera Left Near Their Nest, Cuteness Ensues

Here’s a cute little video that shows what happened when As Goprod set up a camera next to the next of an owl family. After the mother flies away, the little baby owls come out to investigate the mysterious object that showed up out of nowhere.
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external Japanese Swordsman With A Camera —NYTimes | LENS

“My shooting method was once compared to an ancient sword trick in which one slashes his enemy at the same time as he removes the sword from his sheath,” Mr. Suda, 74, said in an interview translated by Miyako Yoshinaga, who has recently curated “Issei Suda: Life In Flower, 1971-1977.

 
Sep 30, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »