PetaPixel

Lomography’s Cine200 Tungsten Film is Cinema Film Repackaged for 35mm Stills

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Lomography released yet another unique type of film emulsion. Or rather, it’s managed to repackage an existing emulsion, converting it for use in 35mm cameras.

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external An Incredible Photo Of An F1 Race Car Flipped Upside Down —Business Insider

felipe-massaAP photographer Petr David Josek shot this crazy photo of a flipped race car after a collision at the German Grand Prix.

 
Jul 22, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Digital Artist Uses Photoshop to Bring His Childhood Drawings Into the Real World

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Twenty years ago, at the tender age of 4, Netherlands-based artist Telmo Pieper wasn’t quite as skilled at his craft as he is now. And so, in his series Kiddie Arts, he decided to revisit some of his ‘early work’ and bring it up to speed using his prodigious Photoshop skills. Read more…

Are You Up For a Challenge? Try ‘The 6 Minute Dirty Edit’

The video above is called The 6 Minute Dirty Edit Challenge, and it’s an interesting project/dare by photographer Jeff Rojas. The goal is simple: how much retouching can you possibly get done in just six minutes time. Read more…

external Fujifilm X30 With 2/3-Inch Sensor —Fuji Rumors

Trusted source says the new Fujifilm X30 will continue to sport a 2/3-inch rather than the rumored 1-inch.

 
Jul 22, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Surviving in the New Economy

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It’s true. Both Neil Leifer and Walter Iooss worked for free.
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Researchers Use a 480-Camera Dome to More Accurately Capture 3D Motion

Traditional 3D motion capture technologies, amazing though they are, are limited. They only give you a small number of data points to work with, and while they seem to capture a great deal of detail, their abilities are far outpaced by the intricate movements of the human body.

Fortunately, there’s a new technology in development that might just be able to solve this problem by throwing a crap-load of cameras at it. Read more…

Forget Clouds: Man Photographs Cheetos That Look Like Things

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Have you ever looked up and noticed that a particular cloud looks like a face, a dog, a ship, or some other object? It’s a psychological phenomenon known as pareidolia, where the human brain takes randomness and tries to turn it into something significant and known.

Andy Huot’s project Cheese Curl Art revolves around pareidolia, but instead of spotting things in clouds, Huot photographs Cheetos. Recognize the Cheeto above? The photographer captioned it, “Sasquatch.”
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external Will Your Photos Outlast You? —The Online Photographer

One of my ongoing interests—I won’t use the word concerns because that could imply worry or anxiety—is how long my images will last. Given my own impermanence, I lack the hubris to expect that any photographs I’ve produced will last forever. I’d certainly love for later generations to consider my work good enough to be worth maintaining, but that’s up to them to decide, not me. In any event, I won’t be around to enjoy it.

 
Jul 21, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Photographing the Nazca Geoglyphs in Peru: An Interview with Photographer Ed Ranney

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Aroma Valley, Chile, 2006. © Ed Ranney

Edward Ranney has been photographing pre-Columbian sites in Peru for over fifty years. His book Monuments of the Incas was released in 1982, reprinted in paperback in 1990, and re-released in 2010 by Thames and Hudson in an expanded edition, with updated text.

His monograph The Lines, being released in August by Yale University Press, presents pictures of geoglyphs created by the Nazca culture in southern Peru, and other cultures in Chile’s Atacama desert. Read more…