Posts Tagged ‘120film’

This DIY Pinhole Camera Was Inspired by the Iconic Diana F

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Ray Panduro knows most everything there is to know about pinhole cameras. As his previous design shows, he’s a determined artist who can get the job done using fairly standard material and a healthy dose of elbow grease.

Today, he adds another masterpiece to his creative pinhole lineup, a Pinholga that is a recreation of the iconic Diana F medium format point-and-shoot. Read more…

Lomography Unveils the LC-A 120: ‘The World’s Most Compact Fully-Automatic 120 Camera’

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Lomography has officially announced the LC-A 120, a 120 film model of its successful 35mm LC-A+ and LC-Wide cameras. Small and automatic, Lomography has officially deemed this little guy, “the world’s smallest fully-automatic 120 film camera.” Read more…

Fujifilm Discontinues Neopan 400 PRESTO 35mm and Fujicolor PRO 400 120 Film

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Queue up Queen’s Another One Bites the Dust, because it’s time to mourn the loss of two more analog films. Despite talk that certain segments of the analog market are doing well, specific types of film that are having a hard time selling continue to kick the bucket.

The most recent of these are Fujifilm’s Neopan 400 PRESTO 35mm black-and-white and Fujicolor PRO 400 120 color film. Read more…

Behold Lux: The 100% Do it Yourself, 3D-Printed Medium-Format Camera

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“Do-it-yourself” can mean a lot of things, but for camera dweebs, it’s usually entailed some degree of scavenging and recycling parts from factory-made cameras. Grad student and specialty camera builder Kevin Kadooka understands the ease and accessibility of the practice but doesn’t think it’s sustainable — eventually we’ll run out of old cameras to cannibalize.

So for his latest project, the hardcore tinkerer decided to go 100% homebrew, producing a camera that uses nothing from an existing camera. Instead, his handsome medium-format Lux camera relies on off-the-shelf electronics and mechanical parts and a body constructed of plastic panels produced by a 3D printer. Read more…

A Photography Tattoo Based on 120 Film Backing Paper Designs

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Photographer Michel Jones has one of the most unique photography-related tattoos we’ve seen yet. While most photography enthusiasts who get inked may choose designs that are easily recognizable by the general public (e.g. cameras, lenses, photos), Jones went with a design that is enigmatic to most people and even foreign to many photographers. His tattoo is based on the backing paper that comes with 120 film.
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Hyperscope: A Custom-Built Cylindrical Pinhole Camera for Roll Film

In the Star Wars universe, Lightsabers are hand-built as part of their wielders’ training, and each one is as unique as the person who made it. Photographer Matt Abelson seems to have the same idea about cameras: he builds high-quality one-of-a-kind pinhole cameras based on his own designs.

The Hyperscope (shown above) is one of his creations. It’s a cylindrical can camera that takes medium-format roll film, and is crafted out of chunks of aluminum.
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Lomography Belair X 6-12 is a Medium Format Camera with AE and Bellows

Just because a camera has bellows doesn’t mean it’s vintage. Just announced today, the new Lomography Belair X 6-12 has bellows as well. It’s a portable medium-format camera that shoots auto-exposed photographs on 6×12 film — the world’s first camera to do so.
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A Look at the Image Quality of Plustek’s $2,000 OpticFilm 120 Film Scanner

One of the latest entrants in the at-home film scanning game is the Plustek OpticFilm 120. Just announced a few months ago and made available for pre-orders earlier this month, the OpticFilm 120 is a professional caliber scanner that can digitize both 35mm and 120mm medium format film. With a price tag of $2,000, it’s not exactly wallet-friendly for the average film shooter, but is quite affordable when compared to other medium-format pro-grade scanners on the market.

If you’ve been wondering about the image quality of the scanner (and whether or not it stacks up well against your local photo lab), Plustek has released a few full-resolution untouched scans.
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How to Have Your 120 Film Developed at Walmart for $3 a Roll

Update: We’re hearing that Walmart is no longer offering medium format film development.


Want to try your hand at shooting medium format 120 film but not sure where you’d get it developed? Stacie Grissom of Stars for Streetlights recommends WalMart as an easy and affordable option:

I have an awesome tip for you. I actually got my Holga prints developed through Walmart for about $3 per roll. That’s it. I could not believe it. Here’s what you need to do:

For each roll of film, take a separate film envelope and write “SEND OUT ONLY” at the top. Then fill in your info. “Send Out Only” means that Walmart will send it to a photo lab to be developed instead of developing it in the store. I don’t know how many (if any) Walmarts still develop 35mm film, but they definitely won’t do 120 film. Just send it out to a lab that knows what to do. Next, in the special instructions section, make sure you write “120 Film Processing, 4×4 prints.” And then drop them in the box! It’s seriously that simple. I was really paranoid when I sent out my film, but Walmart actually did a nice job.

Grissom also offers a number of other tips for shooting with Holga cameras.

7 Tips for Holga Cameras [Stars for Streetlights]