PetaPixel

Crowd-Funded Journalists Geo-Locate ISIS Training Camp Using the Militants’ Own Photos

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Using photographs released by the militant group ISIS (The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) and satellite imagery openly available to everybody, a group of crowd-funded citizen journalists believe they have pinned down the location of an ISIS training camp. Read more…

external Why I Love My Leica —The Guardian

From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Annie Leibovitz, many of the 20th century’s most defining images were shot on a Leica. [The Guardian's] technology columnist, a lifelong fan, tells the story of the camera that almost died and was triumphantly reborn in the digital age.

 
Aug 25, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · 1 Comment »

7 Simple Tips, Tricks and Ideas for Taking More Creative Smartphone Photos

COOPH, The Cooperative of Photography, is back in the photo tip game again, this time showing us 7 smartphone photography tips you’ll want to be writing down if you ever shoot with the computer in your pocket.

From unique panorama uses to a clever way to easily take partially underwater photos, these tips are quick, easy and will certainly add a little variety to your Instagram arsenal. Read more…

A Retinal Neuroscientist’s Rebuttal: Why Humans Can’t See Near Infrared, No Matter What They Eat

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One of the more interesting stories we ran across this weekend was an initial update from a small group of scientists who claim to have successfully extended human vision into near infrared. Their data seems to show that they have, indeed, managed to do this simply by altering their subjects’ diet by restricting vitamin A1 and supplementing with A2 in order to create a certain protein complex. You can read more about this here.

The results seem exciting, mind-blowing even. But retinal neuroscientist and photographer Bryan Jones begs to differ, and he has been kind enough to let us reprint his full rebuttal below. Read more…

external Musings: Antonio Gomez Takes a Walk on Las Vegas’s Surreal Side —National Geographic

The Eiffel Tower, ancient Roman statues, an Egyptian pyramid against a background of palm trees. At first glance, you’d think that photographer Antonio Gomez traveled around the world to create this work. Yet, if you look closer it becomes clear that we’re not looking at iconic landmarks in Paris, Rome, or Cairo—strangely enough, they all exist on a single street: Las Vegas Boulevard.

 
Aug 25, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Rumor: Zeiss Will Soon Announce the ‘Loxia’ Lens Line for Full-Frame Mirrorless Systems

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Sony full-frame mirrorless users rejoice, because the latest rumors indicate that ZEISS is looking to make your day. Recently trademarked by ZEISS, ‘Loxia’ is believed to be a new line of full-frame lenses designed specifically for mirrorless systems, which, for now, means the Sony a7, a7r and a7s. Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Fan Ho’s Fantastic Black-and-White Street Photographs of 1950s Hong Kong

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Photographer Ho Fan has been shooting black and white street photography since the 1950s. At the time, he was living in the poor, rundown Central neighborhood of Hong Kong. The streets, filled with food and trinket vendors, captured the recent Shanghai transplant’s attention. It was with this fascination that Fan took his camera to the streets, documenting the intriguing life around him. Read more…

external A Look Back At Yahoo’s Flickr Acquisition For Lessons Today —TechCrunch

Flickr decided in January 2005 to take the Yahoo offer — reportedly for $35 million. There were too many compelling reasons to take the offer during what was still an uncertain time. Because it was early in the growth of tech startups after the dot-com crash, Flickr missed some of the up-tick in the market, as others sold for more when the market took off: Myspace sold to News Corp. for $580 million in July 2005 and later YouTube, which Google acquired in October 2006 for $1.65 billion in stock. “We definitely made the wrong decision in retrospect. We would’ve made 10 times [what we did]. But it’s not like I regret it,” Butterfield says.

 
Aug 25, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Photographer Files Vague Patent, Sues Others for Shooting and Selling Photos of Sporting Events

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In the world of patents, some money, a lawyer and the carefully crafting a few hundred words can go a long way — for better or worse.

One such example is the case of Peter Wolf, owner of Photocrazy, a company that takes photos of sporting events such as triathlons, then offers prints to the participants by matching their race number to an internalized, searchable database.

And although this concept has been around for quite some time in various forms, EFF reveals that Wolf managed to get three patents on this generalized idea and is now attempting to squash other, smaller operations that use a similar method. Read more…

The Burning Man Time-Lapse to End All Burning Man Time-Lapses

Seven minutes. It’s not often we run across a time-lapse that lasts seven minutes, and even less often we actually watch the whole thing, slack-jawed, from start to finish. That, however, is what happened with photographer Roy Two Thousand‘s most recent creation: Lake of Dreams. Read more…