Posts Published in April 2012

The Only Anonymous Photo to Ever Win the Pulitzer Prize

Every photo has a story, and this particular photo has one of the most interesting stories of them all — a story of anonymous fame, and famous anonymity. To this day the above photo, titled “Firing Squad in Iran,” is the only anonymous photo to ever win a Pulitzer Prize. And although the photo was taken in 1979, the photographer behind the lens didn’t receive credit until 2006. Read more…

Amazing “Real Time” Clocks Created Using 12-Hour-Long Loops of Video

Artist Maarten Baas has a project called “Real Time” in which he creates one-of-a-kind clocks using a video camera and boatloads of patience and dedication. He creates 12-hour-long loops of people manually setting the time on various clocks… in real time. The video above shows his grandfather clock exhibit in which the hour and minute hands of the clock are painstakingly drawn in every minute of every hour for twelve hours.
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The Afghan Box Camera: Not-So-Instant Instant Photography

The Afghan box camera, or kamra-e-faoree as it’s called in Afghanistan, is a humble creation that has served its purpose well for many years. We say humble because the “camera body” consists of a wooden box, the “focusing apparatus” is a metal shaft attached to a piece of wood, and the “shutter” is controlled by removing and reinserting the “lens cap” manually. Read more…

How to Transform a Cheap Foot Candle Meter into a DIY Light Meter

For those of you amateur photographers out there who like shooting film, sometimes old cameras don’t have the right light meter for getting the correct exposure. Sometimes they are faulty, inaccurate or have no light meter at all! Photographic light meters can be pretty expensive but analog foot-candle meters are cheap because they don’t really have any photography purpose, until now. This guide will show you how to put it to work for photography.
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Emotive Portraits of Majestic Horses

“All the Wild Horses” is a photo series by South African photographer Andrew McGibbon that consists of beautiful studio portraits of horses. McGibbon writes,

For thousands of years the horse has been mankind’s closest ally. The horse made travel and development possible. We tethered, weighted and reigned them. We captured, stabled and trained them.

Ever willing, the horse was the magnificent tool of man’s ingenuity. The Horse is a beast of legend, taking on its own character, personality, emotion and mythology. However, with the advent of the steam engine the horse was made obsolete, and now they are resigned to the realm of shows and races, a world of equestrian sport, a mere shadow of the beast’s former glory.

McGibbon says painstakingly lit each shot in a manner reminiscent of the portraiture of the rich and famous.
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Create a Film Noir Look Using This Homemade Telescopic Snoot

A typical snoot is used to control the direction and radius of of the light you’re casting onto your subject, and they’re great for getting certain effects. But photographer Peter Miesch‘s take on the snoot is a bit different; used right, his will give your photos a film-noire effect like you see in the example above. Read more…

Claude Glass: The 18th Century Version of Instagram

Everybody knows that the Instagram app made its name giving photos an old, instant film look. But what if we were to tell you that there was something even before that time, even before cameras, that gave a scene the same aesthetic? Well there was, and it was called a Claude glass. Read more…

How to Shoot Great Sunrise Photography

In this video from Master Photo Workshops photographer Jim Zuckerman shows you how he creates his iconic sunrise photography, using a beautiful lighthouse as his subject. He begins with the basics of choosing your subject and exposure well and then continues on to explain the need to move quickly, “work the scene,” and understand that auto white balance works against you in sunrise and sunset scenes.

The information is straightforward, maybe even basic, but it leads to some amazing photos.

(via ISO1200)

Massive 1700mm Carl Zeiss Lens

If you thought Nikon’s 6mm Fisheye lens from a week ago was crazy, get a load of this Carl Zeiss telephoto lens announced at Photokina back in 2006. The made-to-order lens was called the Apo Sonnar T* 1700 mm F4, and that little nub at the end? That’s a Hasselblad 6×6 medium format camera.

The monster weighed in at 564lbs and had to use a special focusing method because of the sheer weight of each glass element. At the time this was the biggest non-military telephoto lens in existence, which begs the question: What does the biggest military zoom look like!?

For another look, check out this picture of the lens being showed off at Photokina.

(via DPreview)

Nikon D800 vs Hasselblad H4D-40 Comparison Video

This video, done by The Camera Store with help from Roth and Ramberg, is sure to stir up some controversy. One side will say that 35mm couldn’t possibly compete with medium format, while the other will point out that the price difference makes the whole debate moot. In a way, they’re both right; but this comparison video does a great job of pointing out the benefits and pitfalls of each camera when it comes to skin tone, low light performance, and dynamic range.

Take a gander at the video and give us your take in the comments down below. (Keep in mind that image details won’t show up nearly as well in the video as they did in the studio).

D800 vs Medium Format with Roth and Ramberg (via fstoppers)