syria

Syrian Photographer Stops Shooting to Rescue Injured Boy

Syrian photographer and activist Abd Alkader Habak is being praised today, not for a photo he took, but for one he decided not to take. After being blown over by a massive explosion that took out a convoy of busses filled with evacuees, he stopped shooting and attempted to help the young victims instead.

Should We Care Who Took This Photo?

Mahmoud Raslan’s photograph of “the boy in the ambulance” from Aleppo has struck a chord with viewers in a way that we haven’t seen since Nilüfer Demir’s image of 3-year old refugee Alan Kurdi in 2015. The photo and accompanying video of 5-year old Omran Daqneesh covered in dust and blood and sitting motionless is a stark reminder of a desperate war that started the year he was born.

26 Before-and-After Pics Reveal What War Has Done to Syria

Once Syria's largest city, Aleppo has been the worst-hit city in the country since the Battle of Aleppo began in 2012 as part of the ongoing Syrian Civil War. Now a series of before-and-after photos reveals just how much the once-vibrant historical city has been marred by war.

The First Ever VR Film Shot in a War Zone with a 360° Camera

The American news media company RYOT recently sent its World Editor, Christian Stephen, to the war-ravaged streets of Aleppo, Syria. While there, he used a 360° camera to capture the world's first virtual reality film of the inside of a war zone.

It's an immersive short film that gives viewers a unique perspective into what the Syrian civil war has done to the country's largest city.

Syrian Refugee Children Capturing and Sharing Their Lives with Disposable Cameras

The Syrian civil war has been raging for over four years now, and millions of Syrians have fled their homes and into neighboring countries as refugees. As refugees struggle with basic necessities and figuring out their futures, a new project has popped up to give refugee children a creative outlet and a voice through photography. Hundreds of children have been documenting their tumultuous childhood experience using disposable cameras.

Journalist Blames Photographer’s Reckless Behavior for the Kidnapping of Freelancer Steven Sotloff

It's unlikely that pointing fingers and placing blame will do anything to help freelance journalist Steven Sotloff, who was kidnapped in 2013 and is currently being held by ISIS, the same militant group who executed photojournalist James Foley on video.

But blame is being placed, and there's a lesson to be learned from the supposed actions of one Canadian photographer initially identified only as "Alex."

Terrifying GoPro Footage Captures Syrian Tanks Wreaking Destruction

Editor's Note: Although there is no direct footage of men dying, fighters on both sides lose their lives during this footage. It is not for the faint of heart.

Iconic conflict photographers are thought of as such because they do something that your standard news coverage just can't do: they show the realities of war. Statistics enumerating the number of people killed or displaced by conflict are just numbers on a page until someone captures the reality of these numbers on film... or sensor.

The video above was not shot by a conflict photographer, but it too captures that reality of war in a profound and shocking way. For an hour, you can spend time looking through the eyes of a Syrian tank column as it wreaks unimaginable havoc.

Shocking ‘Second a Day’ Video Delivers a Powerful Anti-War Message

"Just because it isn't happening here, doesn't mean it isn't happening." That's the tagline of one of the most powerful, shocking ad campaign we have ever run across.

Put together by Save the Children UK, this campaign uses the popular 'second per day video' lifelogging concept to drive home an anti-war message in the most stark and unsettling way, focusing on how war affects children.

My Experience Photographing on the Front Lines of the Syrian Civil War

It’s cold. The air is stinging my ears and my hands are numb. I pull back on my gloves and resume huddling in the conner of the courtyard. It’s December in Aleppo and the air is bitter, but the overwhelming sense of dread comes not from the cold, but from overhead. Early morning, midday, through the night; the aerial bombardment doesn’t stop. The sound of a jet buzzing overhead and those terrible trails of white streaming from the underbelly as missiles launch. Distant blasts and then closer ones. Mortar strikes as well. Silence and then an explosion.