Posts Tagged ‘whitehouse’

Chief White House Photog Pete Souza is Now an Instagrammer

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How do you take the next step after rising from humble newspaper shooter to chief official photographer for the White House? You start sharing pictures of your lunch, of course.

At least that’s the strategy for Oval Office documentarian Pete Souza, who opened his new Instagram account Wednesday with an image of healthy snacks aboard Air Force One.
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Hear What It’s Like to Serve as an Official White House Photographer

As a followup to our post earlier today about former White House photographer Eric Draper’s work, here’s an interesting and relevant 17-minute-long story that aired on NPR in January of this year. It’s an interview with former presidential photographers Eric Draper and Robert McNeely, who photographed the presidencies of George W. Bush and Bill Clinton (respectively).
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Photographer Offers ‘Front Row Seat’ to George W. Bush’s Presidency

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Have you heard of Chief Official White House photographer Pete Souza‘s predecessor? His name is Eric Draper, and he’s a photographer who spent eight years serving as George W. Bush’s White House Photo Director and personal photographer.
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Photos of the White House Gutted During Its Truman Reconstruction

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Did you know that the White House was completely gutted and rebuilt on the inside between 1949 and 1952? After decades of poor maintenance, the building was in danger of collapsing in 1948, which forced President Harry Truman to move out and commission a complete gutting and rebuilding of the building’s insides.

The U.S. National Archives has been publishing photographs showing the gutted White House to its Flickr photostream.
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The Best Photos of 2012 by White House Photographer Pete Souza

Here’s a gallery of 83 of the best photographs captured by Pete Souza, the official White House photographer for President Obama. You can view thumbnails of the entire set here.

We’ve written about Souza and his work a number of times in the past. We shared a reflection piece of his back in October, and wrote about the fantastic documentary, The President’s Photographer, the year before.

Reflections by President Obama’s Official Photographer

As President Obama’s four-year term in office comes to an end, TIME magazine caught up with his official photographer Pete Souza for thoughts on his career so far. It’s a pretty fascinating read:

Souza recalls one meeting that he missed because it had been rescheduled unbeknownst to him. “I was a little upset with the President’s secretary for not telling me that they had moved the meeting up, and [the President] heard us talking and he said, ‘What are you talking about? You were in that meeting.’ He’s so used to me being there that he thought that I had been in the meeting that I wasn’t even in. So I took that as a compliment.”

His access to Obama’s inner circle and day-to-day routine stems from the trust he built during their relationship prior to the presidency. “I’m there to seriously document his presidency. I’m not looking for cheap shots, and I think that’s the kind of relationship any White House photographer should have with the President they’re covering,” he says. “That they have a level of access and trust that will lead to important photographs for history.”

They also asked Souza to submit an edit of more than 100 photos that provides a nice overview of some of his best shots.

Pete Souza’s Portrait of a Presidency [TIME Lightbox]


Image credit: Photograph by Pete Souza/The White House

Photog Sues Police After Unlawful Arrest Leads to Loss of White House Credentials

When photographer Mannie Garcia — known best, perhaps, for his iconic photograph of President Obama — was arrested for disorderly conduct while recording Maryland police officers performing an arrest, he didn’t realize that it would mean the loss of his White House credentials. And although he was eventually acquitted and given back his camera (with the memory card missing), the damage had already been done and Garcia is looking to hold someone accountable. Read more…

A Virtual Tour of the White House Using Google Street View Photography

Google recently brought its Street View camera inside the White House for the Google Art Project’s documentation of the artwork found within. In addition to displaying the art itself, the website also features a Street View-style museum view of the White House, allowing you to walk around inside virtually. Earlier this year Google did the same thing for photography mecca B&H Photo Video in NYC.

The White House – Museum View (via Coudal)

Presidential Speeches to Be Captured in Real Time… by a Single Photographer

The White House announced last month that it would be ending the long-running practice of reenacting Presidential speeches for photographs, but stated that they were still working out how the new system would work. Last week it reached an agreement with the White House Correspondents’ Association — rather than reenacting photos for a larger group of photographers, a single photojournalist will be given permission to shoot future speeches as they happen:

[…] news photographers will now be permitted to designate a single representative to act as a “pool” for the entire press corps. The photos taken by the pool representative will be made available to all news organizations. Reporters use a similar pool system for presidential events in which space is limited. [#]

“Hey, no pressure, but the world’s media is depending on your photos!”

(via The Washington Post)

White House to End Long-Running Practice of Photo Reenactments

The White House is ending its long-running practice of reenacting speeches for still photographs after the controversy was rekindled last week by President Obama’s Osama bin Laden speech.

After Obama’s live, late-evening address from the East Room of the White House on May 1, five photographers were ushered in to shoot pictures as the president stood at the podium and re-read a few lines of his speech – a practice that news organizations have protested for years.

Even though The Associated Press and other news outlets said in captions to the photos that they were taken after the president delivered his address, many people who saw them may have assumed they depicted the speech itself. That raised questions of whether news organizations were staging an event. [#]

Today a spokesperson for the President stated, “We have concluded that this arrangement is a bad idea,” and that the administration is working on a new method for photojournalists to make photographs of actual speeches.

White House Announces End To Re-Enactments For News Photographers (via Rob Galbraith)