Posts Tagged ‘infrared’

Long-Exposure Infrared Photos of Trees

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London-based photographer Martin Stavars has a beautiful series of photographs titled, “Portraits of Trees.” For each of the photographs, he set his infrared camera up in front of a large tree and opened up the shutter for anywhere between four to ten minutes.
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Black-and-White Infrared Time-Lapse of Clouds Floating Over Landscapes

Australia-based photographer Glen Ryan has been working on a long-running infrared project called Invisible Landscapes. He recently created the gorgeous time-lapse video above featuring the limestone landscapes near Wee Jasper in New South Wales for an exhibition at the Karst Country exhibition. The black-and-white infrared images make the clouds overhead pop out of the dark sky in the background.
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Smartphone Thermal Imaging Attachment Becomes a Reality

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A few months ago, we told you about a neat, open-source attachment created by modder Andy Rawson that could instantly turn your smartphone into a thermal imaging camera. At the time, Rawson was intending to sell the production models for $150 and otherwise open source the project for the DIYers out there. Well, add about $25 to the price tag and a ridiculously successful Kickstarter campaign and you’ve got the IR-Blue.
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Gorgeous Infrared Landscapes With Trees of Gold and Silver

If you want to enjoy some eye-popping infrared landscape photographs, look no further than the portfolio of French photographer David Keochkerian. He photographs gorgeous landscapes using an infrared sensitive camera, which causes the green tree leaves to show up as golden yellow and silvery white, and turning spring into fall and winter.
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iPhone 5 Has Purple Flare, Possibly the Same Issue That Plagued the Leica M8

If you were thinking about buying the iPhone 5 as your primary carry-around camera, you might want to hold off on that. Reports are emerging that the camera suffers from purple flares when bright light sources are in or around the frame. Cult of Mac reports that iPhone 5 owners are taking to online forums to express their displeasure with this issue.
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Starry Portraits Shot Using an Infrared Camera and a Microsoft Kinect

“Dancing with Invisible Light” is a project by San Francisco-based photographer Audrey Penven, who used an infrared camera to capture portraits illuminated by the invisible structured light emitted by a Microsoft Kinect.

With these images I was exploring the unique photographic possibilities presented by using a Microsoft Kinect as a light source. The Kinect – an inexpensive videogame peripheral – projects a pattern of infrared dots known as “structured light”. Invisible to the eye, this pattern can be captured using an infrared camera. The Kinect uses the deformation of this dot pattern to derive 3D information about its subjects (an ability which has already spawned an explosion of incredible digital art).

As a photographer I am most interested in the nature and quality of light: how light behaves in the physical world, and how it interacts with and affects the subjects that it illuminates. For this shoot my models and I were essentially working blind, with the results visible only after each image was captured. Together, we explored the unique physicality of structured light, finding our way in the darkness by touch and intuition. Dancing with invisible light.

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Unique Photos of Eastern Congo Made Using Infrared Film

For his project Infra, photographer Richard Mosse photographed landscapes, villages, and people in Eastern Congo using Kodak Aerochrome infrared film.
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How to Turn an On-Camera Flash into a Transmitter for Optical Sensors

Optical sensors are a cheap way to trigger slave flashes if you don’t want to pay for a wireless transmitter, but the fact that you’re firing your on-board flash to trigger the sensors limits your creative options. Flickr user Victor came up with the idea of turning an on-camera flash unit into an infrared transmitter by covering up the flash with a filter. The filter is simply a piece of processed (but unexposed) E6 slide film — it blocks visible light, making it completely black, but allows infrared light to pass through and trigger optical sensors.

Using Infra Red Masters To Trigger Optical Slaves [DIYPhotography]


Image credit: Photographs by Victor W.

Apple Patent Appears to Show System for Disabling Camera Remotely

Apple recently filed a patent having to do with baking infrared communication capabilities into the iPhone. Although there are certainly useful applications for the technology (e.g. a museum beaming information to the phone at different exhibitions), what’s troubling is that the feature may also allow the camera to be remotely disabled by those who wish to prevent photography.

[...] the transmitter could be located in an area where photography is prohibited and the infrared signal could include encoded data that represents a command to disable recording functions.

This example could easily apply to movie theatres trying to stop customers from filming a movie for illegal distribution or any kind of music concert to protect an artist’s image from being photographed or videoed illegally, as shown below. [#]

I don’t know about you, but I don’t want a camera that could be disabled remotely by a third party…

(via Patently Apple via Engadget)

Night Vision Compact Camera Lets You Shoot in Absolute Darkness

The Midnight Shot NV-1 Night Vision camera by ThinkGeek is a compact camera specially designed for infrared photography. Instead of permanently removing the IR filter from a traditional digital camera, the Midnight Shot allows the filter to be retracted when you want to use it as an IR camera. It shoots 5 megapixel stills, VGA video, and has built-in IR illumination that lets you shoot and film in complete darkness.
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