infrared

Remembering Ansel Adams Through the Life of One Student

Ansel Adams was born on February 20, 1902, in San Francisco, California. An exceptional photographer and environmentalist, he is best known for his iconic black and white images of the American West.

Photographer Captures the Beauty of Latvia in Infrared Photos

During the summer of 2021, I was invited by a close friend living in Latvia to visit the country for a few days. Totally foreign to the Baltic countries, I was able to discover Latvia through different aspects, from its capital Riga to national parks and forests, passing by a memorial of the Second World War.

How Infrared Photography Can Create Stunning Sci-Fi Night Photos

Infrared photography is mostly used to create alternative and dreamy landscape pictures during bright days, giving nature specific hues from clear white to vivid yellow or red. But this technique has also a high potential in urban photography too, moreover at night.

How to Choose the Best Lenses for Infrared Photography

Not all lenses perform well with infrared. A fantastic lens for normal visible light photography may be terrible for infrared (aka “IR”) photography. Choosing the right lens can be tricky.

Infrared Photos of France, From Iconic Places to Hidden Gems

For the last years, I have spent every summer traveling across France to discover the diversity of its landscapes and its natural heritage. Usually, summer is synonymous with crowds of vacationers and tourists. For this project, summer is also synonymous with lush nature, in which infrared photography works the best to reveal alternative colors.

Using an Infrared Flash for Stealthy Street Photography

Street photography is one of the most appreciated genres in photography. By showing daily life in a new way, it can speak to everyone. That explains why some of the most famous photographers are street photographers: Henri Cartier-Bresson, Vivian Maier, Martin Parr, Diane Arbus, or Joel Meyerowitz. They created iconic pictures by finding the right moment to catch the interesting details that no one else could have seen.