Posts Published in August 2012

Shooting Studio-Lit Portraits of a Dancer in Motion at 14FPS Using a Canon 1D X

The 14 frame per second continuous shooting speed of the Canon 1D X DSLR probably isn’t a feature you’d associate with studio-lit portraiture, but that’s exactly what Australian fashion photographer Georges Antoni demonstrates in the short clip above. Using the Broncolor Scoro for stobe lighting, Antoni unleashes the full FPS potential of the camera in order to capture a model dancing in as many still frames as possible.
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The Kent State Massacre Photo and the Case of the Missing Pole

Recognize this photograph? It shows 14-year-old Mary Ann Vecchio screaming and kneeling over the body of 20-year-old Jeffrey Miller, shot during the Kent State Massacre. Kent State photojournalism student John Paul Filo — just 22-years-old at the time — captured the image, and was later awarded the 1971 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography.
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New Leaked Photos of the Fujifilm X-E1 Shows the Flash, Top, and Back

Fujifilm’s soon-to-arrive X-E1 mirrorless camera is one slick-looking camera. The more affordable sibling of the X-Pro1 leaked itself some more today. New photos, originally published on Digicam-info, shows the pop-up flash that extends from the top of the camera, as well as clear views of the top plate and back. If you thought the front of the camera was beautiful, the good news is that the beauty extends all the way around.
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How the Curiosity Rover’s Photography Decisions Are Made

Earlier this month, when we were exploring why the NASA Curiosity rover’s cameras are so lame, we mentioned that the total amount of data the scientists can transfer on a daily basis is only around 31 megabytes. As anyone with a restrictive cell phone dataplan can attest to, having a small data cap makes you think carefully about the data that you choose to download. Glenn Fleishmann over at The Economist has an interesting writeup that sheds some light on how NASA scientists make their Martian photo shoot decisions:

Every day Justin Maki faces a tricky balancing act. He is one of the boffins at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) responsible, among other things, for deciding what Curiosity photographs each Martian day, or sol, and which pictures it sends back home. “We can always take enough pictures to fill up the downlink,” Dr Maki says. The mission can currently beam at least 30MB a sol, including scientific measurements, engineering data and images, from Mars, via two satellites orbiting the planet, to Earth.

All of the rover’s 17 cameras, seven more than any previous exploratory vehicle, store images in a raw, unprocessed format and initially beam back tiny thumbnails (which NASA uploads as they come in). The scientists working on different aspects of the mission meet daily to determine which of the thumbnails to download in higher resolution. The “health and safety” of the rover takes priority. After the deliberations, which can last over an hour, instructions are dispatched to Mars.

Taking pictures on Mars: Red eyes (via Boing Boing)

GIMP is Now a Self-Contained Native App for Mac OS X

GIMP, the image editing program that’s a popular open-source alternative to Photoshop, is now easier than ever for Mac users to start using. Though it was completely free, installing it has long required that X11 also be installed — a major pain in the butt. That changes with the latest version of GIMP: the app is now a self-contained native app that’s a breeze to install. It’s as simple as dragging and dropping.
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Minimalist Gravity-Defying Photos Using String and Perspective

Photographer Carl Kleiner, the man behind IKEA’s beautiful baking recipe and kitchen item photographs, has a delightful new series of images that features things neatly arranged in mid-air instead of on a table. More specifically, each of the shots uses simply trickery to make household objects look like they’re floating in a blue room.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Samsung Galaxy Camera Unveiled, More Phonecamera Than Cameraphone

Well, that’s one leaked camera certainly didn’t take long to become a reality. Less than half an hour after we shared the first leaked photos of the Samsung Galaxy Camera, the camera was officially announced over in Berlin. Here’s the basic spec lowdown: Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, a 16 megapixel 1/2.3″ BSI CMOS sensor, a 21x f/2.8-5.9 23-480mm (35mm equiv.) lens, a 4.8-inch HD LCD screen, a minimal smartphone-esque design, a 1.4Ghz quad core processor, 8GB of internal storage, ISO of up to 3200, and 3G/Wi-Fi or 4G/Wi-Fi.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera Photos, Specs, and Details Leak

Want a phonecamera instead of a cameraphone? It’s something that we were joking around about just months ago, but it might soon become a reality. It has only been two days since rumors of a Samsung Galaxy-based camera emerged, but now photos, specs, and details about the camera have been leaked. Portable gadget blog Pocketnow somehow got its hands on a press kit, revealing details about the compact camera that the web has been itching to find out.

The photograph above confirms what the rumors suggested: that the camera can best be described as a compact camera slapped onto a standard smartphone.
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Win One of Three Boxed Copies of Adobe Lightroom 4 Worth $150 Each

Update: This giveaway is now over. The winner was randomly selected and announced below.


For our “giveaway o’ the week” this week, we’re giving away three copies of Adobe Lightroom 4 worth $150 each. If you went on vacation this past summer and have a boatload of photographs that you need to organize and post-process, this program can help you do it.
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Sony NEX-5R Announced, Features Wi-Fi and Downloadable Apps

After weeks of leakage on the Internet, the Sony NEX-5R mirrorless camera was finally announced today. As the rumors said, the camera features both Wi-Fi and downloadable apps — two things that look to be huge trends in the camera world this year.

The basic specs for the camera are as follows: it features a 16.1 megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, a hybrid autofocus that combines phase and contrast detection (a first for the NEX lineup), a max ISO of 25,600, 10 frame per second continuous shooting, 1080/60p HD video recording, and a 3-inch tilting LCD touchscreen.
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