Posts Tagged ‘passageoftime’

Creative Time-Lapse of Kuala Lumpur Bounces Between Day and Night

If you have two minutes to spare, you’ve got to check out this time-lapse video by photographer Rob Whitworth. There are plenty of time-lapse projects on the web, but one thing in particular about this one caught out eye: the transitions. Whitworth came up with some of the most creative transitions we’ve seen so far in a city time-lapse. Scenes bounce between day and night. Shots zoom from one into another. It’s like a roller coaster for your eyes.
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7 Colorful Hours of a Sunset Captured in a Single Photograph

Turkey-based photography enthusiast Isil Karanfil created this beautiful image showing an entire sunset in a single photograph. Karanfil fixed her Nikon D60 in its view of the seascape, and then shot a single photograph every hour for seven hours between 3pm and 9pm as the day turned into night. She then took the resulting photographs, sliced them up, and combined them together using Photoshop for the image seen above, which she titles, “Sun Lapse”.
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Time-Slice Photo and Video Showing the Very Large Telescope Over One Night

Inspired by photographer Richard Silver’s time-slice photos that we featured last month, European Southern Observatory Fellow Gabriel Brammer decided to do the same thing, except with photographs of the ESO’s Very Large Telescope in northern Chile instead of NYC buildings.
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Using Time-Lapse Photography to See the Movement of Massive Glaciers

People sometimes use the expression “slow as a glacier” to describe something so stagnant that even the speeds of snails and molasses would feel inadequately fast in comparison. The fastest glaciers ever measured move at tens of meters per day, while the slowest ones may budge only have a meter over the course of a year. Most of the time, the movement is too slow for the human eye to see.

Luckily for us, there’s something called time-lapse photography. Back in 2004, PBS aired a NOVA episode titled Descent into the Ice, which followed photographers and adventurers as they ventured deep into the heart of a glacier found on Mont Blanc. One of the things they did was set up cameras to capture the movement of glaciers over extremely long periods of time. The video above shows 5 months of movement seen under a glacier moving 2 feet per day.
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Time-Lapse of Daily Photos from the First 21 Years of a Young Man’s Life

Photographer Noah Kalina has taken a self-portrait a day for the past 12.5 years, but his already-impressive project has now been bested by one that’s nearly twice as long. When Leeds Met University student Cory McLeod was born 21 years ago, his parents began faithfully documenting his life by taking a single photograph of his face every single day. This past week, the project was published as a one-of-a-kind video titled “21 Years” that shows McLeod’s entire life in roughly six minutes.
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Layers of Light and Time Captured on Single Frames Using a 4×5 Camera

London-based photographer Tony Ellwood has a project called In No Time that deals with our perception and awareness of our passage of time. All the photographs are of the same pier on a beach that Ellwood visited over a period of six months. His technique, which took him 18 months to develop and perfect, involves visiting the location multiple times for each photo — sometimes up to three times a day for multiple days. Using a 4×5 large format camera, Ellwood creates each exposure across multiple sessions, as if he were doing multiple exposure photography, but of a single subject and scene. Each exposure time ranges from a few seconds to multiple hours.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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12.5 Years of Self-Portraits by Noah Kalina in 7.5 Minutes

On August 27, 2006, photographer Noah Kalina uploaded a highly influential video to YouTube. Titled everyday, the video was a time-lapse spanning six years of self-portraits showing Kalina staring expressionlessly into the camera. The video has since amassed tens of millions of views, and has spawned countless copycat projects and videos.

Luckily for the Internet, Noah has kept up his daily picture taking, and today he uploaded an updated version of the video spanning 12 years and 5 months. It contains over 4500 daily portraits and runs a little less than 8 minutes in length. This translates to roughly 10 frames every second, and 1 month every three seconds.
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Jump Man: An Amazing Self-Portrait-A-Day Video Five Years in the Making

After the viral success of Noah Kalina’s self-portrait-a-day video everyday, there has been no shortage of people copying the idea and creating their own versions of the project. However, not many come close to the awesomeness and creativity of the video above, created by a guy named Mike (Thisnomyp on YouTube).

Almost exactly one year after Kalina’s video hit the web, Mike began taking one self-portrait each day, starting on August 25, 2007. Five years later, this past weekend, Mike was able to compile all the photos into the video seen above, titled “Jump Man.”
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365 Day Photo Project with Whiteboard Results in Creative Stop Motion Video

This creative stop-motion video was created over the course of one year by a boy named Kristen (unbeatableme on YouTube). He took at least one photograph every day for 365 days showing himself standing in front of a whiteboard. By changing elements inside the shot (e.g. his clothing, the art on the whiteboard, his hair), Kristen made one of the most “time-consuming” animation projects we’ve seen.
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Four Sisters Recreate Childhood Photos Taken Decades Ago

Wanting to see how she and her siblings have changed over the years, Helsinki-based photographer Wilma Hurskainen decided to gather her three sisters together and recreate photographs of the four of them taken by their father decades ago.

The project, titled Growth, features roughly 30 rephotographed images. Hurskainen tried to keep the new images as similar to the old one as possible, paying attention to things like location, composition, pose, and expression.
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