Posts Tagged ‘DIY’

ArnoSync: An Impressive DIY High-Speed Insect Photography Rig

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There are DIY projects that just about anybody can do — for example, turning an old film canister into a flashlight — and there are DIY projects that have a very specific “Y” in mind.

The ArnoSync High-Speed photography rig falls into the latter category. But even if you don’t have the engineering prowess to build it yourself, it’s still worth taking a look at what this home-brew rig can do. Read more…

Groom Wears Glasses Camera to Capture Wedding from His Point of View

When technology and marketing director Michael Kammes got married to the love of his life earlier this year, he wanted to capture some footage from a unique perspective that most people don’t get to see: the groom’s. Using a 1080p keychain camera, he created what may be the first ever pair of groom point-of-view hidden camera glasses.

The video above are the highlights of the footage, captured throughout the ceremony and reception.
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DIY: Transform an Old Film Canister Into a Tiny Flashlight for Your Camera Bag

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Here’s a good weekend project for those of you who have some old film canisters lying around, and a bit of DIY know-how up your sleeves. Those old film canisters done need to go to waste, with a little work you can turn them into tiny portable flashlights. Read more…

Hacking an Old Polaroid Big Shot So That It Syncs with Modern Day Flashes

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A lot of people love the “vintage look” in photography these days.

Of course, it’s one thing is to capture it with the plethora of software readily available — or by applying “vintage filters” (like the ones on Instagram) to a digital image — and it’s another thing entirely to get old technology to work for us today and create photographs just like we would have done 30, 40 or even 100 years ago. Read more…

Company Gives Old Cameras and Strobes New Life as Light Fixtures

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Taiwanese company Ystudio is in the business of keeping the craftsmanship behind old, often discarded products alive. And in the case of the lamps and light fixtures you see here, that meant breathing new life into old film cameras and strobes. Read more…

DIY: Film Canister Bag Address Tags

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I’ve seen lots of used film canisters repurposed as dangling bag accessories for sale in trendy parts of Hong Kong. The idea is to drill or burn a small hole in the top of the plastic spool and fit a keychain to that. I figured it would be a lot more useful to use the can to give a return contact address in case the bag is lost and found. What better way could there be than to use film? Read more…

DIY: How to Make a Pinhole Camera Out of Concrete

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It’s Sunday, which might mean doing your best to keep your mind off of the workweek to come, or already setting about planning next weekend. If you happen to be doing the latter, and there’s room in your schedule for an interesting photography DIY project, we’ve got something for you: a do-it-yourself concrete pinhole camera. Read more…

Use Beach Glass as an Awesome Medium for Photo Transfers

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One of our popular posts back in 2011 was a quick video tutorial on how you can use Mod Podge to transfer photographs onto blocks of wood (we also shared a text-based tutorial earlier this year).

If you thought that was cool, get this: you can also do the same type of photo transfer onto pieces of beach glass!
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Transport a Tripod by Adding a Strap to the Bottom of a Camera Backpack

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Sick of carrying your tripod separately from your camera backpack? If you have certain types of backpacks, you can add your own strap loop system to the bottom to serve as a makeshift tripod carrying feature.
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Ghetto-Flo: How to Create Your Own DIY Kino-Flo-style Lights for Portraiture

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We were introduced to the “Ghetto-Flo” lights after reading the excellent blog of New York-based photographer Brad Trent. He had mounted 4 standard workshop fluorescent light fixtures into light-stand mountable strip lights. “Ghetto-Flo” because they’re similar in use to the much more expensive Kino-Flo lights, though there are advantages to the later (variable power and output).
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