Posts Published in April 2012

Polaroid Land Camera Advertisements from the 1950s and 1960s

Back in the 1950s and 1960s, Polaroid sponsored shows like “The Tonight Show” during which the hosts would take time to endorse the cameras during the show itself rather than cut to commercials. The montage above takes viewers back to a time when fancy new Polaroid cameras cost $69.95 — or $1.19 a week.
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Trigger Your Camera 12 Different Ways With Triggertrap’s New App

When we told you about the StrikeFinder app earlier, we mentioned that what set it apart was that it used your actual iPhone’s camera; it wasn’t just acting as the trigger. Well, Trigertrap’s new mobile app is just acting as the trigger, but it’s acting as a very comprehensive trigger. Read more…

An 8-Bit Explanation of the Three Basic Components of Exposure

Matthew Gore of Light & Matter created this beginner-friendly video tutorial on the three basic elements of exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. It’s explained with easy to understand illustrations and examples, and features graphics and sounds that are reminiscent of old 8-bit video games. You can also find a text-based version of the tutorial here.

The Three Basics of Photography (via Xatakafoto)

Olympus OM-D 5-Axis Stabilization Tested by a Man Suffering From Hand Tremors

One of the interesting features in Olympus’ OM-D EM-5 retro-styled camera is the 5-axis image stabilization, which shifts the sensor in 5 different axis directions (existing systems generally use 2) to compensate for camera shake. It’s a feature that caught the eye of Vimeo user Fiatopichan, who suffers from essential tremor (a neurological disorder that causes his hands to shake at about 5-10 Hz). He decided to buy the camera to test out the new system, and reported his findings in the video above. The stabilization is quite impressive.

(via 43 Rumors)


P.S. Here’s a video put out by Olympus that introduces the 5-axis system.

Starry Portraits Shot Using an Infrared Camera and a Microsoft Kinect

“Dancing with Invisible Light” is a project by San Francisco-based photographer Audrey Penven, who used an infrared camera to capture portraits illuminated by the invisible structured light emitted by a Microsoft Kinect.

With these images I was exploring the unique photographic possibilities presented by using a Microsoft Kinect as a light source. The Kinect – an inexpensive videogame peripheral – projects a pattern of infrared dots known as “structured light”. Invisible to the eye, this pattern can be captured using an infrared camera. The Kinect uses the deformation of this dot pattern to derive 3D information about its subjects (an ability which has already spawned an explosion of incredible digital art).

As a photographer I am most interested in the nature and quality of light: how light behaves in the physical world, and how it interacts with and affects the subjects that it illuminates. For this shoot my models and I were essentially working blind, with the results visible only after each image was captured. Together, we explored the unique physicality of structured light, finding our way in the darkness by touch and intuition. Dancing with invisible light.

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StrikeFinder Lets You Capture Lightning and Fireworks on Your iPhone

There are plenty of light-sensitive triggers on the market, some triggers even use your smartphone, but Ubertronix‘s new StrikeFinder app is the first mobile app that lets you actually take the pictures with your phone. Instead of designing a trigger app that attaches to an external camera, the StrikeFinder app released earlier today lets everyday iPhone users simply point their phone camera in the direction of say, lightning or fireworks, and the phone does the rest for them.

The app only just hit iTunes today and will run you $1.99 if you wanna give it a shot. And although we won’t know how well it works until people get it out in the wild, the Ubertronix press release made a good point: “Thunderstorms can pop up anywhere.” Whether you’re a photographer stuck watching a lightning storm without your camera; or an everyday photo-lover who would love to get a few, good quality lightning shots; the StikeFinder app is definitely promising.

StrikeFinder (via Photo Rumors)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Flash Game: Escape From the Darkroom

“Darkroom Escape” is a simple flash game in which you’re stuck in the darkroom of a photo studio and must escape using only the items in the room. The idea is pretty simple, but the difficulty is pretty ridiculous. If you can figure everything out without looking up the answers, you’re either a savant or someone with way to much free time. You can play full screen here or watch a walkthrough video with the solution here.

(via GamesHandbook via Photoblog.hk)

Sony Springs a Massive Leak of NEX-F3 and A37 Photographs

Not so much a “leak” as the proverbial flood gates opening, earlier today the Indonesian website Yangcanggih released what amounts to a full gallery of both the new NEX-F3 and A37 cameras, giving Sony fanboys (and girls) plenty to get excited over. The pictures confirm many of the previous rumors: the NEX-F3 does have a pop-up flash, and the 180-degree tilting screen is also a feature; while the A37 is receiving an articulating screen as well.
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Lonely Diving Photos Snag Grand Prize in Google’s Photo Contest

Last November Google launched a Photography Prize for finding the “photography stars of the future”. After receiving entries from 20,000 students in 146 countries, Google announced the winners last week. The grand prize winner was Viktor Johansson, a 24-year-old photography student from Sweden who photographed the loneliness of competitive diving:

The judges were impressed and captivated with his series that focused on Christoffer Eskilsson, Sweden’s best male diver from 10 metres. Viktor has chosen to show us an alternative view, one that we are not used to seeing from sport photography in the media. Instead of glamorous action shots of an athlete in competition, he has produced arresting and unexpected photographs that focus on the long, lonely hours of repetitive training and practice that it takes to excel in your field.

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Canon Possibly Working on an Entry-Level Full-Frame DSLR of Its Own

With Nikon rumored to be working on the D600 as an entry-level full-frame for later this year, it’s only right that Canon jump into the fray as well, and jump they have (maybe). Rumors that Canon has had a new entry-level full-frame in the works began circulating at the end of March, and now we’re hearing that an announcement may be planned for the 2012 Holiday Season.
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