Posts Tagged ‘darkroom’

A Beautiful Look at the Meticulous Process Behind Large Format Photography

In the world of analogue photography, the larger you go in format, the more time, discipline and resources it typically takes to capture and develop your photographs. And while the age-old technique of developing film takes due diligence no matter the format, large format photography in particular has a certain quality to the process that makes it stand out from the rest.

The above video, shared by photographer Lúis Plácido, takes a captivating look at that process. Read more…

Darkroom Gear Recycled Into Chic Table Lamp

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You, of course, are an analog purist who will forever be devoted to film. Other folks, however, may be wondering what they’re going to do with a bunch of darkroom equipment that’s getting lonelier by the year. Read more…

Marked Up Photographs Show How Iconic Prints Were Edited in the Darkroom

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Want to see what kind of work goes into turning a masterful photograph into an iconic print? Pablo Inirio, the master darkroom printer who works at Magnum Photos‘ New York headquarters, has personally worked on some of the cooperative’s best-known images. A number of his marked-up darkroom prints have appeared online, revealing the enormous amount of attention Inirio gives photos in the darkroom.
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Enfojer: An Analog Darkroom for Printing Your Digital Smartphone Photos

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Enfojer is a new darkroom kit that mixes age-old analog photography processes with digital smartphone photography. It’s a simple and portable photographic enlarger that’s designed specifically to turn your smartphone photographs into physical prints created with chemicals.
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Koloid Brings the Look and Feel of Wet Plate Collodion Photography to iOS

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With the rise of digital photography, good old-fashioned film processing has, for the most part, become a thing of the past for many of us. But with a new app called Koloid, photography enthusiasts can play around with the look and feel of wet plate collodion photography while creating digital images with their iPhones and iOS devices.
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How to Process C-41 Color Negative Film at Home, From Start to Finish

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I know there are a few guides out there for home processing, some of which were instrumental in helping me get over my fears. All of these other guides seemed to be a little incomplete and that lack of detail made me wait longer than I should have before taking the plunge. In reality, it’s easy to do your film at home. Let me show you!
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Photographer and Lab Owner Discusses the Art of Film Photography and Printing

Over the years, Billy Mork has been a photographer, an art director and even a practicing architect, but he ultimately ended up back where his passion lies: in black and white film photography. This inspirational short film — put together by broadcast media student Duong Thai Anh for a class at LASALLE College of the Arts in Singapore — tries to capture a bit of that passion and pass it along to you. Read more…

A Personal Darkroom Built Inside a New Backyard Shed

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A number of years ago, England-based photographer Dave Miller wanted an at-home darkroom, but didn’t have the luxury of converting a spare room in his house into one. He did, however, have a nice garden area that wasn’t being used, so he decided to upgrade the grassy area with a shed — a darkroom shed.
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Amazing Surreal Photomontages Created Without the Use of Photoshop

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Upon first glance, artist Thomas Barbèy‘s surreal photomontages may seem rather amateur when compared with all the highly-polished photomanipulations that are floating around on the Internet. However, one simple fact will make you see the pieces in an entirely different light: Barbèy shoots film and uses in-camera and darkroom techniques to create the works!

That’s right: he eschews Photoshop and digital trickery in favor of analog processes.
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BTS: Creating a Wet Plate Portrait Using an Ordinary Negative and an Enlarger

Slovenia-based professional photographer Borut Peterlin was recently tasked with shooting a portrait of painter/illustrator/author Milan Erič for influential Slovenian magazine Mladina. Peterlin decided that he wanted to create a wet plate collodion photo, but spent weeks worrying about whether he would be able to accomplish it given the tight schedule of the on-location shoot. He writes:

I can’t get rid [of] questions like where will I work, who will complain about it, where will I get water, will there be a drain to waste used water and developer, will there be enough light, will the person being portrayed have enough patience and what if something will go wrong with chemistry? If everything goes well, I make a portrait in an hour and if it doesn’t…

The night before the shoot, Peterlin decided to just play it safe by shooting the portrait on standard film and then converting the picture into a wet plate “in post” in a darkroom.
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