Posts Tagged ‘blastfromthepast’

Blast From the Past: Take a Trip on New York City’s Subway System Circa 1905

In the past, we’ve had occasion to share some great color film footage that showed London and the UK as a whole all the way back in the 1920s. We’ve even shown you some stateside footage shot by a French tourist in the 1930s.

The latest bit of historical footage we’ve come across isn’t in color (unfortunately), but it does show a New York City staple right after it was first built: The New York City Subway System. Read more…

How They Sent Photos Across the Ocean Back in 1926

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These days, it’s easy to take for granted what the magic of the Internet, wireless technology and fiber optic cables has made possible, but there was a time when sending a photograph a long distance in a short time wasn’t quite that easy.

For instance, in 1926, someone on an oceanliner called the S.S. President Roosevelt snapped the above photo of the S.S. Antinoe during a rescue attempt. When that photo was sent almost instantly from London to New York City, it was such a big deal that the April 1926 issue of Science and Invention printed a huge infographic to show its readers how this miracle was achieved. Read more…

Did You Know: TIME Magazine Once Gave Away Free 35mm Cameras to Subscribers

Back in 1985, TIME magazine was determined to get more subscribers. We know this because of the special TV offer you see above. If you happen to be around when this commercial aired, all you needed to do was call the number to get a TIME magazine subscription for 40% off, and a free 35mm camera! Read more…

Blast From the Past: Canon Ad Shows Off Its Cutting Edge 1989 Still Video Cameras

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When cutting edge technology translates into RAW video, 14fps burst capabilities and smartphone megapixel counts in the 40′s, it’s easy to take it for granted and forget where digital photography started.

So here’s a little reminder of what digital photography looked like a couple of decades ago in the form of a Canon ad that boasts the capabilities of its still video systems, the digital camera before digital cameras. Read more…

This Zoomable Composite Aerial Photo of San Francisco is Like a 1938 Google Earth

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What you see above is an ultra-high resolution aerial photograph of San Francisco as it looked in 1938. The David Rumsey Historical Map Collection put the image together using 164 large format black-and-white photos of SF that were shot in 1938. When viewed through a zoomable image viewer, the composite photo is pretty much a 1938 version of Google Earth’s satellite view.
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Photos of San Francisco in 1951, Snapped Through a Navy Submarine Periscope

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In 1951, a diesel-powered US Navy submarine called the U.S.S. Catfish passed under the Golden Gate Bridge and did a short tour of San Francisco Bay. While there, the crew decided to snap some photographs of San Francisco… through its periscope.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Old Color Footage Shows What London Looked Like Back in 1926

Want to see what London looked like back in the year 1926? Check out this beautiful color footage shot in various London locations by Claude Friese-Greene, an early British pioneer of film. Frisse-Greene created a series of travelogues nearly 90 years ago using a color process developed by his father William Friese-Greene.
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How Photographers ‘Photoshopped’ Their Pictures Back in 1946

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Retouching and manipulating photographs is done with fancy photo-editing programs these days, but back in 1946, making adjustments required a lot more than a computer, some software, and some pointing-and-clicking skills. Retouching required a whole box of tools, a very sharp eye, and an extremely steady hand.

Last year, Gene Gable of CreativePro came across a retouching book from 1946, titled, “Shortcuts to Photo Retouching For Commercial Use.” In it, retoucher Raymond Wardell explains the basics of the techniques at the time–think of it as a “Photoshop 101″ book for photographers who came more than half a century before us.
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Old-School Photos of People Posing With Old-School Cameras

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One of the big trends in the camera industry these days is the stuffing of “big camera” sensors into “small camera” bodies. After all, if you can get the same image quality from a camera that’s smaller in size, why wouldn’t you want to? (That’s the idea, at least).

The quality and portability of cameras these days would be quite astonishing to photographers from back in the earlier days of photography — the days in which you needed both hands and a strong back to work as a photojournalist. In this post, we’ve compiled photos from those “good ol’ days” to see how far photography has come.
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Six Years Ago, Apple Made a Crowd Gasp With Pinch to Zoom and Swiping

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If you want a taste of how fast technology progresses in the world of digital photography, just look at the consumer camera industry through the lens of a company that continues to make a big splash: Apple.

When Steve Jobs unveiled the original iPhone on January 9, 2007 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, cameras on phones were horrible and viewing those shoddy pictures was a pain. Then, almost overnight, the smartphone photography revolution — and the slow demise of the compact camera — began.
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