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What a Shape Charge Explosion Looks Like at 5 Million FPS

The Slow Mo Guys have captured a shaped charge explosion at five million frames per second, showing its path of destruction as it tears through a variety of items. The explosions were captured using a high-speed camera that filters out the color in order to preserve the detail of the image.

This Crazy Camera Rig Spins a Phantom Camera at 150RPM

Steve Giralt is a photographer and "visual engineer" who uses wild-looking camera rigs to capture eye-popping shots seen in ads. His latest project involved a large, heavy camera rig that spins a Phantom VEO 4K high-speed camera around a tabletop subject at 150 rotations per minute.

This New Phantom Camera Can Shoot 4MP at 6,600FPS

Vision Research has announced its latest Phantom high-speed camera, the Phantom v2640. This camera is the fastest 4-megapixel camera ever made, capturing a stagging 6,600 frames per second. Drop the resolution down to 1080p, and you can shoot at a whopping 11,750fps.

How Phantom Ultra-Slow-Mo Cameras Are Made

If you ever see an ultra-slow-motion clip online, there's a good chance that it was shot using a Phantom high-speed camera. The 12-minute video above is a behind-the-scenes look at how the cameras -- which cost upwards of $150,000 -- are made.

Watch a High Speed ‘Cinebot’ Capture Some Killer Slow Motion Shots

Not everything looks better in slow motion, but a whole lot of things do. Case-in-point, check out this behind the scenes video that shows a high speed robotic arm being used to capture slow motion footage, and then shows you the sweet results. (Warning: There is very brief nudity around 1:40).

Copy or Inspiration? A $6.5 Million Photo of Antelope Canyon and Mine

About a year ago, photographer Peter Lik announced that he sold a print of Antelope Canyon for $6.5 million to a private investor. There has been no independent confirmation of this transaction. Many in the photography community thinks that it might be a PR stunt.

So when I had the chance to visit the slot canyons of Page Arizona, I had in mind Peter Lik's image of "The Phantom," an ethereal black and white taken in Upper Antelope Canyon. Armed with a tripod, fast, wide lens and a sand-throwing guide, I attempted to make a similar photo.