bullettime

Photographer Creates Bullet-Time Rig with 15 Raspberry Pi Cameras

Famed bullet-time expert Eric Paré decided to challenge himself by building an experimental bullet-time rig using the Raspberry Pi Camera Module V2, a tiny 8-megapixel camera. While he encountered a few problems with the rig, he eventually got the 15 cameras working together without using custom electronic components.

Using 72 High-Speed Cameras to Capture Bullet-Time Slow Motion

The Hydraulic Press YouTube channel is already an entertaining (if occasionally painful) watch. Who doesn't want to see things get crushed and/or explode... in slow motion? But the channel recently took it up another notch by setting up a ring of 72 high-speed cameras to capture some awesome bullet-time slow-motion footage.

How to Fake the Look of ‘Bullet Time’ Using a Single Camera

Here's a new 3-minute music video by Russian/Ukrainian group 5'Nizza. In it, the band finds themselves in a variety of situations, but as the action is frozen they keep on singing while the camera pans around them. How was it done? It turns out the effect was created with a single moving camera and a green screen.

Moving Light Around Objects Frozen in Time by High Speed Cameras

We won't waste time hemming and hawing: this is just plain cool. Using a patented technology, Satellite Lab can move a light source around an object at 10,000 feet per second while capturing that same object in super slow motion, creating an effect we'll call "bullet time 2.0".

How to Shoot Bullet Time by Swinging an iPhone on a String

Skier Nicolas Vuignier recently shared a viral video in which he created "bullet time" footage of himself skiing by swinging an iPhone 6 around his head using a special contraption he built himself.

The original 3-minute video can be seen above, in case you haven't watched it yet. It amassed well over 3.5 million views in just a couple of weeks.

This Skier Shot ‘Bullet Time’ by Swinging an iPhone 6 Around His Head

Matrix-style "bullet time" is usually created using an array of cameras placed all around a subject. Swiss professional skier Nicolas Vuignier has been testing a new technique that only uses a single camera: he swings his iPhone 6 camera around using a long rope.

Vuignier calls his iPhone experiment the "Centriphone." The video above contains some awesome shots he made using it while speeding down snow-covered mountain slopes.

Fire Breathers Captured in Slow Mo and Bullet Time Using 50 Cameras

In addition to running a giant stock footage archive of over 1,500 4K clips, Philadelphia-based DOP Mitch Martinez also shoots Time Slice, or Matrix-style Bullet Time, footage.

The video above shows slow-motion and bullet-time footage of firebreathers spewing fireballs. It was captured using a rig of 48 DSLRs, a RED Epic, and a Panasonic GH4.

CamSwarm Turns Multiple Phones Into a Bullet-Time Camera Array

The "bullet time" effect popularized by the 1999 film The Matrix is generally done by arranging a large number of still cameras on a circular track, so most of the rigs out there cost quite a bit of money to put together. A Columbia University researcher named Yan Wang is trying to make bullet-time imaging more accessible. With his CamSwarm technology, all you need is a group of friends who have smartphones or tablets.

This is the Result of Fooling Around with an Array of 140 Canon DSLRs

Simon Byrnes of The Pixelist operates a time-freezing camera array consisting of 140 Canon 1100D (AKA the Rebel T3) DSLRs. One client has been the UK show Got To Dance, for which the cameras are used to capture bullet-time sequences of dancers. During a period when the TV show was off air, Byrnes decided to have some fun with the rig and captured some shots that became the video above. It's titled "The Timefreezers."