Posts Tagged ‘stockphotography’

Getty Critics: Poking Fun at Flawed Stock Photography

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Art directors Andrew MacPhee and Bart Batchelor are intimately familiar with Getty Images’ massive stock photo library. Over the course of their careers, they’ve had to dig through tens of thousands of photos to find ones that would do for whatever campaign they were working on.

But for every “right one” they found, there were hundreds of “wrong ones.” And for every hundred “wrong ones” there were at least one or two that were downright hilariously absurd. It seemed only right that these ridiculous stock photos be shared with the world: thus was born Getty Critics. Read more…

Stock Site Stats Reveal the Most Popular Cameras Among Stock Photographers

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About a week ago, the stock photography website Dreamstime got in touch with us to offer us some exclusive information. Having recently added a “search-by-camera” feature, they had compiled a huge amount of statistical data on the most popular cameras being used by their 150,000+ contributing photographers.

Well, keeping in mind that Francis Bacon once said “knowledge is power,” we told them to go ahead and send the stats over. What we received was a veritable smörgåsbord of interesting (and perhaps useful) information. Read more…

PicoImages Hopes to Shake Up the Stock Industry Through Crowdsourcing

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Most stock photography websites and agencies work the same way: photographers upload their work, set prices, and let clients browse for what it is they’re looking for. If the client wants a photo of a family on the beach, they’d better hope someone came through. And on the other end, the photographer has to hope that they’re putting work out there that people will actually want to use.

Advertising creatives Cassandra Nguyen and Grazina Snipas’ new website PicoImages does away with that model, replacing it with more of a “stock photography to order” sort of system. Read more…

Creative Ad Tells a Beautiful Love Story Using 85 Seconds from 105 Stock Videos

AlmapBBDO, the ad agency behind the touching Getty ad “From Love to Bingo,” are at it again. Last time they spent six months picking 873 stock photos out of 5,000+ options to create an award-winning one minute video.

This time Getty asked them to do the same thing, only using the agency’s massive video archive instead. The resulting video is, dare we say, even better than the “Love to Bingo” ad. Read more…

Photog Accuses Getty of Loaning Images to CafePress Instead of Licensing Them

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Photographer Remi Thornton recently terminated his contract with Getty after finding out that the agency was allowing online retailer CafePress to use his images on potential merchandise without paying an up-front licensing fee.

In fact, according to Thornton, CafePress has an exclusive agreement with Getty, which allows them use any of the agency’s Royalty Free stock to populate their store, while only paying the photographer if the merchandise featuring their image actually sells. Read more…

Why I’m Ditching Getty Images in Favor of Stocksy for My Stock Photo Sales

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Dear Getty Images: I quit.

I just sent Getty Images the email above, which, I think, is how I terminate my relationship with them. Hopefully. I’m not 100% sure, but I can’t seem to figure out any way to do it online, so I’m hoping that email works.
Read more…

Stocksy is a New Stock Photo Co-Op by the Founder of iStockphoto

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Bruce Livingstone knows his way around the stock photography industry, and he’s doing his best to shake things up. After founding iStockphoto in 2000, he turned it into a microstock juggernaut, finally selling it to Getty Images in 2006 for a whopping $50 million. Now, as both Getty Images and iStockphoto are mired in a licensing controversy, Livingstone has a new stock photo business that may rock the boat even more.

It’s called Stocksy, and is a co-op for stock photographers who want to step out from under the shadow of giant stock photography companies.
Read more…

iStockphoto Booting Top Photographer in Wake of Getty/Google Hoopla

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A new controversy is brewing in the world of stock photography. Just last month, it came to light that Getty had agreed to license 5000 of its stock photos to Google while paying the creators of the images a meager one-time fee of $12. Now, one of Getty’s most successful stock photographers is claiming that his account is being terminated in the aftermath of the first hoopla.
Read more…

International Stock Agency Alamy Opens Door to Smartphone Photos

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Over the last couple of years, smartphone photography has gained a lot of credibility. Many stock photography agencies, however, have managed to keep their “no smartphones allowed” signs proudly on display even as all of this was happening.

Due to the required megapixel counts and the high quality standards most stock photo agencies try to maintain, smartphones have, for the most part, been kept out of that particular business. Companies are starting to cave though, and the most recent of these is international stock agency Alamy. Read more…

What Stock Photo Buyers Are Looking for in the Year 2012

If you’re trying to make some side money by selling photographs as microstock — or are trying to do it full-time — it’d be wise to heed the advice of one of the most successful players in the industry: Yuri Arcurs. He has published an interesting “state of the industry” report with his thoughts on the types of photographs that are currently in demand with stock photo buyers.

As all active microstock photographers must have noticed, we have seen a constant decrease in sales in terms of our return per image over the last few years. It’s becoming increasingly difficult to shoot great images and profit from it in the same way as it was 5 or 6 years ago. Many critics have claimed that the microstock industry is almost entirely devoid of artistic sensitivity, and is instead only concerned with making an easy profit. But surprisingly, this harsh criticism seems to have had a positive effect on the industry as a whole, because although the return per image has decreased a lot, I have also witnessed an interesting tendency: To make sales now, it’s about getting back to the roots of photography. More artistic, less processed images, and a more naturalistic style, which I, personally, fully endorse. It’s great to see some more artistic and natural images making their way up on the “most downloaded” lists as opposed to the more conventional microstock images that are always overly retouched, overly bright and overly clean.

He also writes that many of the concepts and images that were once popular are now stagnating due to the fact that photographers flooded the industry with them, highlighting shifts in four huge categories: lifestyle, business, medical/health, and spa/wellness.

What sells in microstock anno 2012? [Yuri Arcurs]


P.S. If you haven’t seen it already, check out this interview we did with Arcurs last year.


Image credits: Photographs by Yuri Arcurs/PeopleImages