Posts Tagged ‘safety’

PSA: Keep Your Camera Away From Your Face in Rough Waters

Dawn Kish gets hit in a Grand Canyon Rapid

Here’s a helpful safety tip for shooting action shots in or around water: if you’re using your camera in a rough-and-tumbly environment, do your best to keep it at a safe distance from your face. If you don’t, your face could end up looking like the one above.
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The TSA Sets Up an Instagram Account to Show Off the Things They Confiscate

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What do a loaded gun, a stun gun disguised as a pack of cigarettes and an inert grenade all have in common? Pictures of all of them are to be found on the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) new Instagram account, where the government agency is doing its best to show the public the kinds of dangerous things its employees are confiscating on a daily basis. Read more…

Tornado Chasers Getting “Too Close” In Their Hunt for Dramatic Imagery

There has been a series of devastating tornados in the American Midwest recently, and one of the emerging trends — especially in this social media era — is the hunt for dramatic photographs and videos. Earlier this week we wrote about how one particular filmmaker created a tornado-proof vehicle to capture footage from directly inside funnels.

That filmmaker is backed by the Discovery Channel and has the funds and know-how to do things correctly (i.e. “safely”). On the other hand, there is also a new generation of storm chasers who are getting closer and closer to the storms in ordinary vehicles; the video above is one example of when people take their cameras too close.
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5 Critical Travel Tips for Photographers

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I’ve read too many lists online of “traveling photographer tips” that don’t actually appear to be written by actual photographers. Some things work in the real world, others simply do not. Here’s some collected tips shaped from 7 years of travel experience on the road. I don’t think you’ll find most of these anywhere else.
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Why You Should Be Extra Careful When Bringing Camera Gear Through Airports

You’ve probably heard people say that you should keep your camera gear with you at all times when flying, as there are multiple points in the travel process at which your valuable equipment could get stolen or damaged. In case you’re not convinced, check out the video above showing an investigative report that ABC News recently did.

To test airports that have a history of theft, Brian Ross of ABC’s The Blotter left 10 iPads inside the plastic bins at security checkpoints. At 9 out of 10 airports, the screeners followed protocol and immediately contacted the owner using the contact info prominently displayed on the iPad. In the 10th case, an agent was filmed taking the iPad out of the bin before it vanished.
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How Not to To Photograph a Wild Bison

A couple of weeks ago, we shared the sad story of how one hiker was killed after venturing within 50 yards of a grizzly bear to snap photographs. One of the biggest rules for photographing wildlife is to make sure you’re a safe distance from the wild animals. This distance varies depending on the animal you’re photographing. For grizzly bears, you’re supposed to stay at least a quarter of a mile away.

We’re not sure what the safe distance is for wild bison, but one thing we do know: it’s way farther than what we see in the video above. In it, a tourist family visiting Yellowstone National Park come across a bison standing next to the trail they’re on. Instead of finding a safe way around, the people somehow come to the conclusion that walking straight up to the horned animal with outstretched cameras is a good idea. They quickly learn what a bad idea it is. Luckily, no one gets hurt and everyone ends up having a chuckle, but it’s startling to see how much our culture of online photo sharing has eroded common sense in some people.

(via Doobybrain)


Update: Apparently the safe distance for photographing bison is 25 yards. Also, see if you can spot the guy in the background shooting away with his iPad.

Protect Your Camera Gear from Burglars by Keeping it In Your Kid’s Room

If you want to protect your pricey camera gear from burglars, one of the safest places in your house (besides a safe, of course) is one that might not be very obvious to you: your kid’s room. The Readers Digest published a simple slideshow containing home-proofing tips gleaned from the minds of convicted burglars. One interesting tip is that burglars generally don’t go into children’s rooms when hunting for valuables to steal.
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Canon Issues Recall on More Than 68,000 Rebel T4is Due to Grips Causing Rashes

Are you the once-proud owner of a Canon Rebel T4i DSLR? Has your camera’s grip changed from black to white? Have you developed a rash from touching the white grip? Apparently there’s at least one of you out there, because Canon has issued a voluntary recall on nearly 68,200 of its T4i DSLRs. As we first reported last month, some of the DSLRs were loaded with too much “rubber accelerator”, which can lead to a chemical reaction that causes allergic reactions.

The company issued an advisory at the time and offered free repairs, but is now cooperating with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission in issuing the recall — despite the fact that it has only received a single report of a “minor rash”.
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Columbia J-School to Offer Safety Course to Photographers Interested in War Zones

This may be a rare case in which a $695 class might actually save your life: Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is offering a safety course for journalists who cover war, conflict and disaster zones.
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Ricoh Patents Shock-Absorbing Lens Caps

As the saying goes “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” but why not make it better? That’s probably the attitude Ricoh is approaching their newest patent with, because they’re making modifications to one of the few pieces of camera equipment that hasn’t changed since the early days — the lens cap.

The patent isn’t anything revolutionary (i.e. a lens cap with air bags… there’s an idea) but the diagram does include an impact zone with small springs on either side that should add some shock-absorbency so that dropping your lens doesn’t always have to spell disaster. It’s certainly not the be-all-end-all in lens protection, but it’s definitely a step in the right direction.

(via Egami via Popular Photography)