Posts Tagged ‘safari’

Behold the World’s First Elephant Selfie… an “Elfie”

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While he may never forget the moment captured in the photo above, Latabe the elephant apparently wanted to make sure no one else did, either. Read more…

Geotagged Wildlife Photos Help Poachers Kill Endangered Animals

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If you care about endangered animals that are hunted for their parts, here’s something important you should keep in mind: make sure you scrub the GPS data on the images prior to sharing them online. Poachers have reportedly been turning to geotagged photos on social networks in order to find out where they can make their next kill.
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And Then a Cheetah Licked My GoPro…

The title of this post is what we imagine safari guide Matthew Copham says whenever he tells people about his most recent adventure…. well, that or, “and then a cheetah tried to eat my GoPro.” As far as the response he gets, we expect it involves copious amount of Awwwww. Read more…

High Fashion Photos Depict Models as the Five Major Internet Browsers

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What if girls were Internet browsers? That’s the question that fashion photographer Viktorija Pashuta had been dying to answer for a long time before she finally got her chance in Fashion Affair Magazine.

The resulting photographs try to capture the essence of each of the five major Internet browsers — Internet Explorer, Firefox, Opera, Chrome and Safari — in a high-fashion sort of way. Read more…

Giraffic Park: When Photographing on a Safari, Beware the Hormonal Giraffes

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If you ever take your camera on a safari to photograph animals in the wild, here’s one animal you should be careful around: the giraffe.

Sure, it doesn’t have a dangerous reputation like lions or other fierce animals at the top of the food chain, but if you’re not careful around the world’s tallest terrestrial animal—especially the hormonal ones—you may quickly find yourself in a situation that’s strangely similar to a famous scene in the movie Jurassic Park.
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Photographs of Wildlife in Africa Captured from Intimate Perspectives

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Remote cameras can give photographers perspectives they ordinarily wouldn’t be able to capture, and these photographs by photographer Anup Shah show just that. For his project titled Serengeti Spy, Shah traveled to the African savannah in the Serengeti and the Massai Mara and photographed the wild animals using a remote camera.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Close-Up Photos of Wild Lions Captured with an Armored “BeetleCam”

UK-based wildlife photographers Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas got the Internet’s attention a couple years ago with the BeetleCam, a special remote controlled DSLR that allowed them to capture close-up photos of animals in the wild that photographers would have difficultly strolling up to. After the success of that experiment, they decided to return to Africa last summer with upgraded (and armored) versions of the BeetleCam in order to photograph lions in Kenya.
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BeetleCam Shoots African Wildlife Up Close

The BeetleCam is a remote controlled car that has a Canon 400D DSLR and two flash units strapped to the top. It’s the brainchild of brothers Will & Matt Burrard-Lucas, award-winning wildlife photographers based in the UK, and allows them to capture some unique photographs of some of Africa’s most dangerous animals.

William tells us,

We are brothers from the UK specialising in wildlife photography. We aim to use teamwork and ingenuity to take unusual shots of wild animals. Recently we embarked on a project to photograph African wildlife from a ground level perspective using a camera mounted on top of a four-wheel drive remote control buggy called BeetleCam. We took BeetleCam to Tanzania and photographed lions, elephants and buffalo with it. The project proved to be a great success and we managed to get some amazing photographs from a unique perspective.

For more photographs from the BeetleCam, and some videos of the cam in action, check out the BeetleCam project page.


Image credits: Photographs by Will & Matt Burrard-Lucas and used with permission