Posts Tagged ‘experimental’

Experimental Light Painting Self-Portraits

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Self-portraits aren’t exactly ground-breaking — in fact, the word “selfie” was recently added to the dictionary — but Alex DeForest‘s self-portraits are anything but ordinary. His interesting creations mix light painting techniques with self-portrait photography to create some pretty cool results. Read more…

Toy Camera Photographs Developed with Everything From Juice to Medicine

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Ever wonder what resulting photos would look like if you developed film with various liquids found around the house? Photographer Matthew Cetta does too, and he’s actually spent quite some time finding out. Cetta has been doing experiments through a project called “Photogenic Alchemy,” creating toy camera photos with wild aesthetics by developing the films with all kinds of random things — everything from lemon juice to Pepto Bismol.
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Mind-Bending Recursive Illusion Created Using Printed Photographs

Whoa. If you enjoy watching mind-bending concepts that confuse you and make your brain hurt, check out this experimental short by Willie Witte, titled “Screengrab.”

Nothing in the video is computer generated trickery: it simply uses clever camera tricks and a whole lotta printed photographs to create the seamless transitions. “All the trickery took place literally in front of the camera,” Witte says. See if you can understand what’s going on through the entire 1 minute and 30 seconds.
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An Introduction to Playing with Ultraviolet Fluorescence in Photographs

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Ultraviolet fluorescence is a mechanism in which UV radiation excites chemicals in an object and causes them to release visible light. There are many household objects which fluoresce, such as some washing detergents (anything that ‘makes your whites whiter), soda water (it contains a chemical called quinine which makes it taste bitter, and also causes the fluorescence), the dyes found in highlighters, the bacteria found on the face (which cause spots and acne), bodily fluids (including urine) and much more.
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Choros: A Hypnotic Short Film Featuring Single Dancer with 32 “Visual Echoes”

“Choros” is a beautiful experimental film by Michael Langan and dancer Terah Maher. It features a single dancer layered 32 times, which each layer slightly offset in time from the previous one. The “visual echo” technique turns a single woman into a “chorus of women,” and transform the dance from single movements into waves of motion. The 13-minute video is set to the song Music for 18 Musicians by Steve Reich.
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Macro Shots Using a Canon 5D Mark II with a 4×5 Large Format Camera

London-based photographer David Wilman recently did some experiments in which he used a Canon 5D Mark II as a digital back for his MPP 4×5 large format camera. He placed his lens-less 5D at the back of the camera at the film plane and then placed a black cloth over the two cameras to prevent any light from spilling onto the sensor. Light from the Schneider Kreuznach Xenar 4.5/150mm lens entered straight into the open mirror box of the DSLR without any physical link between the two cameras. Wilman was surprised to discovered that this pairing produced quite a respectable macro setup.
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Distress Your Film by Putting It Through a Dishwasher Cycle

There’s a subgroup of film photographers who are dedicated to coming up with inventive new ways to distress film in order to achieve unexpected — and occasionally beautiful — results. Last year we shared that soaking film in rubbing alcohol does strange things to your images. Here’s another crazy idea: put a roll of film through the dishwasher. Photographer Tom Welland did just that and ended up with some vintage-looking photos.
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How to Shoot Sound Painting Photos with Paint and a Speaker

Last week we featured some “sound painting” photographs by Martin Klimas, captured by using a speaker to vibrate paint. Here’s a video tutorial by some Arizona State University Polytechnic students demonstrating how you can do your own “sound painting” photos. They use a thrift store speaker covered with a garbage bag and some Crayola poster paint.

(via ISO 1200)

The Results of Printing 35mm Film onto Skin Using the Sun

Last week we published a post asking whether anyone had made a “print” on their skin by placing a negative on their skin under the sun. After seeing the post, videographer Jeremiah Warren decided to conduct the experiment for the benefit of all mankind. Taping four slides onto his forearm (he didn’t have any suitable negative film), Warren exposed his skin for four hours in 100-degree heat (consuming a gallon of water in the process).

Check out the video above for his results — the “prints” didn’t turn out as awesome as he had hoped. Using negative film might produce better results since slide film prints a negative image onto skin, but it doesn’t seem like sunlight is focused enough to print a sharp image onto skin.

Printing Negatives onto Skin with the Sun

Here’s really random/strange/stupid idea inspired by a comment left yesterday, but have you heard of anyone “printing” a photograph onto their skin using a negative under sunlight? Seems like it would produce a correct positive image of a negative.

Next time you go to the beach, try sticking a negative onto your body and see what shows up at the end of the day!