Posts Tagged ‘data’

An Unexpected ‘Kiss’ in Canon Rebel T4i EXIF Data

If you’ve noticed an unexpected “Kiss” in your Canon Rebel T4i EXIF data, there’s no need to panic (or blush!).

In certain applications that show EXIF data, the camera name may show up as the EOS Kiss X6i — the Japanese market name of the same camera model. Additionally the Camera Settings / Remote Shooting screens of EOS Utility (EU) also shows “EOS Kiss X6i,” according to a Canon product advisory.
Read more…

Google Street View Has Snapped 20 Petabytes of Street Photos

Earlier today Google gave a sort of “state of Google Maps” address to many of the biggest names in tech, and one of the most impressive statistics to arise out of the presentation was that so far, Google Street View cars have driven over 5 million miles and collected over 20 petabytes of imagery. To put that in perspective, that means that the street view cars have travelled enough miles to complete 10 round trips to the moon (and then some) and have stored more than 80 times more information than is contained in the US Library of Congress. You think they have a few extra external hard drives lying around?

(via Engadget)


Image credit: Google Street view-bilen vid Örjanskolan! by jarnakommunikation

Lightroom Plugin Offers and Easy Way to Add EXIF Data for Manual Lenses

Many photographers, especially those who used to shoot film, still enjoy the feedback and control offered by fully manual lenses. The only problem with using these lenses in the digital age is that modern camera bodies don’t recognize them and therefore add no EXIF lens data to your images; adding that data up until now required you to install a command line tool such as ExifTool and learn complicated prompts. But now there’s an easier way to make these changes happen inside of Lightroom. Read more…

Flickr Changes Deletion Policy: 90 Day Grace Period Before Nuking Photos

One of the big complaints users (or ex-users) have against Flickr is that its account deletion process is often unexpected and almost always permanent. Many users — even paid subscribers — have found their accounts deleted and have had no way of appealing and no chance of recovering their data. Flickr finally addressed the issue today by changing its deletion policy — data is now stored for 90 days on the server after accounts are deleted, giving users a chance to appeal. Huzzah!

Your photos and data on Flickr [Flickr Blog]


Image credit: delete by Vitor Sá – Virgu

Protect Your Photos by Learning the Sounds of a Failing Hard Drive

External hard drives are a convenient way to store your digital photographs, but they have finite lifetimes and eventually fail. Failing drives have a number of distinctive sounds that can warn you and give you some time to start a data-exodus to a healthier hard drive. Datacent, a data recovery company, has a useful page on which you can listen to some of the most common “bad drive sounds”. These are categorized by manufacturer, and include things like stuck spindles, disk heads crashing, accessing bad sectors, and bad bearings. If your drive makes any of these sounds while your photographs are still accessible, begin evasive maneuversimmediately!

Hard drive sounds (via Boing Boing)


Image credit: Drive Destruction 11 by Nedster78