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Lytro Shuts Down Its Light Field Photo Sharing Website

It started full of hope and possibilities: In 2011, Lytro promised a camera that could change photography forever with its light-field technology, which allowed photographers to refocus after the shot. But having already announced a change in the company's direction towards video rather than consumer still cameras, Lytro has now shut down its online sharing platform for light-field still images. pictures.lytro.com is no more.

A Look at the Lytro Illum, The Camera of the Future That Failed

Back in 2014, the light field camera company Lytro unveiled the $1,600 Illum, a camera of the future that shoots 40 "Megaray" photos and lets you refocus photos after they're shot. The tech specs were fancy, but no one bought the camera, leading to massive price cuts and eventually a complete change of direction by the CEO. The 5-minute video above is a hands-on look at the Illum.

Lytro’s First VR Demo Uses Immerge to Take You to the Moon

In 2015, light-field camera startup Lytro did a huge pivot, redirecting its focus from consumer light-field cameras (the original and the Illum) to its new light field virtual reality camera, the Immerge. Today the company released a first peek at what the Immerge can do.

755MP 300fps Lytro Cinema Camera Captures a 3D Model in Every Frame

Lytro has ditched the world of consumer cameras, and if the Lytro Immerge wasn't proof enough of this decision, their latest announcement should seal it. Yesterday, Lytro debuted "the world’s first Light Field solution for film and television," a 755MP cinema camera monster.

Why I Lit Up Lytro and Scrapped the Strategy as CEO

My name is Jason Rosenthal, and I'm the CEO of Lytro. A little over a year ago, it became clear to me that we needed to drastically change the direction of our company.

Here’s a Look at Panasonic’s New ‘Post Focus’ Feature in Action

Back in July, Panasonic announced an upcoming feature called "Post Focus" that allows photographers to select their focal point after photos are shot. Instead of using light field technology like Lytro or an array of cameras like Light, Panasonic's feature uses rapid-fire focus bracketing.

Panasonic has begun publishing videos around the world that show how the new feature works.

Interview: Lytro CEO Jason Rosenthal on the Future of Light Field Technology

Lytro’s research into the world of light field technology has produced two consumer devices. Their first camera was released in 2012 and introduced photographers to the concept of being able to refocus images after they had been taken. Then in 2014, Lytro released their flagship: the ILLUM. Armed with an integrated 30-250mm f/2.0 lens, a 40 megaray sensor, and upgraded software, Lytro was ready to show the world that their technology wasn’t just a gimmick.

Report: Panasonic Making the First Interchangeable-Lens Light Field Camera

Lytro may have launched the world's first consumer light field camera back in 2011 and a more powerful followup, the Illum (pictured above), last year, but it may not be alone in rushing for future milestones in light field photography.

Case in point: Panasonic is said to be working on the world's first light field camera that uses interchangeable lenses.

The Science Behind Lytro’s Light Field Technology and Megaray Sensors

The shutter fires and your camera’s digital image sensor is hit by photon particles, creating a two-dimensional photograph; this process is one that photographers are familiar with in their day to day work. However, when Lytro introduced the first commercially available light field camera, the game was changed with a sensor that could capture more than before - aperture and focus became adjustable in post-production, and an interactive perspective became possible.

Wedding Photos Shot with a Lytro Light Field Camera

Earlier this month, we shared some sample photos showing how Lytro's Illum light field camera performed in capturing the NFC Championship game. Here's another look at the camera with a very different subject matter: wedding photographs.