famous

Young Chinese Couple Found Dead Near Iconic Iceland Photo Spot

A young Chinese couple in their early 20s was found dead last week near the famous DC-3 plane crash site in Iceland: an iconic photo spot frequented by photographers and tourists alike. Authorities say there was no sign of foul play, and believe inclement weather is to blame.

One of the Most Iconic Kissing Photos Was Staged

What's up, photography fans? It's Martin here from All About Street Photography, and today I want to talk about the story behind the famous photo Le baiser de l'hôtel de ville (Kiss by the Town Hall) by French photographer Robert Doisneau.

This Famous Pepper Photo by Edward Weston Was a 4hr+ Exposure at f/240

Edward Weston is considered to be one of the most influential American photographers of the 20th century. One of his most famous works, titled Pepper No. 30, is a B&W photo of a single green pepper with beautiful, soft lighting. Here's a fascinating, little-known fact about the piece: it was shot at an aperture of f/240 with an exposure time of 4-6 hours.

13 Celebrities Who Are Serious About Photography

Everyone is a photographer, and that includes celebrities. But some celebrities take their photography more seriously than others, investing both significant time and money into developing their craft. Here’s a small sampling.

How Many Photos Can You Recognize By Their Nickname?

How many famous modern and historical photos are you able to recognize simply by hearing the nickname? Go ahead, read each nickname then try to picture the image in your head.

See Stanley Kubrick’s Iconic NASA f/0.7 Lens & the FrankenCamera It Used

As iconic lenses go, perhaps no lens is quite as iconic as the famed NASA Zeiss f/0.7 glass Stanley Kubrick used to film a candle-lit scene using only natural light. In this video we get to see the lens, find out about the camera Kubrick modified to use it, and discover some of the tricks he employed to shoot that scene.

This Photographer Points His Camera the ‘Wrong Way’ at Famous Places

Do a search for the world's most famous landmarks, and you'll find an endless stream of photos captured by tourists from all kinds of angles. But the photos you'll find probably don't look like photographer Oliver Curtis' images. For his project Volte-face, Curtis visited iconic landmarks and pointed his camera in the opposite direction.