Educational

 

Ted Forbes Answers the Question ‘Should I Work for Free?’

Ted Forbes of the popular YouTube channel The Art of Photography just posted a short 8-minute video in which he discusses the oft-debated question: “Should I work for free?”

“I can tell you that in my 20 year career I’ve run across this offer of work for ‘exposure’ more times than I’d have liked to. I’ve got some fairly strong opinions on this as well,” he says. “You will have to make up your own mind as to what you want to do with your career but hopefully this video will give you a few pointers that might help.”

Man Claims the Sony RX100 III Has Dangerous Levels of Radiation, Is Quickly Shot Down

An Ontario-based vegan who goes by the name Vegetable Police recently released the video above and then began warning photographers with it in online photo forums. He claims that modern digital cameras “output high levels of radiation” and that people should be careful not to have the camera in their hands or against their faces for long periods of time.
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The Original Selfie Stick Was Invented in the 1980s

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Did you know that the selfie stick was actually invented back in the 1980s? The concept didn’t take off until Bluetooth-enabled smartphone cameras in recent years, but the concept has been around for decades now.
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These Animated GIFs Show the Evolution of Cameras Through History

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How have the designs of cameras changed over the past 100 years? The team over at eBay Deals wants to show you. They’ve created a series of animated GIFs showing how the cameras produced by major brands have evolved over the years as styles and technologies changed.
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The Top 10 Cameras Behind Photos Submitted to Shutterstock in 2014

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What are the most common cameras used by stock photographers? While we don’t have the data across all stock services, Shutterstock has provided us with some numbers that may be somewhat representative for the industry.
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This is Why You Shouldn’t Check Your Camera Gear In When Flying

It’s often recommended that photographers keep their gear with them when flying rather than checking it in. If the risk of theft and careless baggage handlers aren’t enough to deter you, check out the video above. It shows one particular baggage pusher system that’s used in an international airport to direct bags onto conveyor belts. As you can see, gentle handling isn’t exactly the goal.

(via 01Bowfin via Reddit)

The Earliest Known Photos of People Smiling

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The following is a collection of some of the earliest known images of people smiling, starting with a pair of soldiers in the Mexican American War in 1847 and up to a group of soldiers near the end of the Civil War.

If early images of people smiling do not come as a surprise to you, there are a few things to note. Among other things, a portrait of a person with a grin of any kind is quite a rare find in the early decades of photography.
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The Closest Color Photo of Pluto Ever Shot

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After a nine year journey towards the outer edge of our solar system, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has beamed back its first color photo of Pluto and its largest moon Charon. The photo above, captured “just” 71 million miles away from the dwarf planet, is the closest color photo ever made of Pluto.
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How an Unknown Photographer Named Carleton E. Watkins Helped Save Yosemite

Did you know that a single unknown photographer helped change the course of history for Yosemite with his photos back in 1861? The video above tells the story of Carleton Watkins, a man whose photos of Yosemite made their way to President Abraham Lincoln and helped influence the decision to turn the area into a National Park.
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The First Photo of an Execution by Electric Chair

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The photograph above has been called the most famous tabloid photo of the 1920s. It’s the first photo showing an execution by electric chair, and was captured by photographer Tom Howard at the execution of Ruth Snyder back on January 12, 1928.
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