Educational

 

Focus Breathing: When Focusing Your Lens Changes Your Composition

Here’s a term that most of you have probably experienced before, but some of you may never have heard before. It’s called “focus breathing” (or simply “breathing“), and it refers to the shift in angle of view that often occurs when you focus a lens. If you’ve ever carefully composed a shot, refocused, and then discovered that your composition changed, you’ve been a victim of focus breathing.

In the video above, photographer Matt Granger offers an explanation of the term and a demonstration of its effects using the “holy trinity” of Nikon zoom lenses. “Even the crème de la crème do have focus breathing issues,” he says.

(H/T Imaging Resource)

The Photographer’s Introduction to Color, from Color Space to Monitor Calibration

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If you’re a photographer today, you’re probably sharing your photos everywhere from Facebook to Flickr. Your photos are being seen on every device possible: iPhones, Samsung Galaxys, crappy Dell office monitors, and Mac Retina Displays. Each online service, each device, even each web browser handles color differently. If you’re putting your photos up online, you really need to think about how you output files for the web. If you accidentally save to the wrong color space, you can really change people’s perception of your photos.
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Your Ordinary DSLR Can Be Used to Detect Planets Orbiting Other Stars

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Did you know that your ordinary DSLR camera has the power to detect planets orbiting other stars? You don’t need a high-powered telescope to look through either. All that’s required is a DSLR, a telephoto lens, and a special contraption that helps your camera track stars.
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This Chart Shows How the Camera Market Has Changed Over the Past Decades

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How have camera sales changed over the past 60 or 70 years? The chart above offers an interesting look at this question. It shows camera production between 1947 and 2014.
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Video Series Walks Through the Major Photographic Processes Used Throughout History

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Back in 2012, the George Eastman House released a series of six videos showing six photo processes used in the history of photography. This month, the museum re-released those six videos alongside six new ones. It’s a video series that now spans 12 videos showing major processes spanning from the Daguerreotype all the way up through digital photography.
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Camera Shake Could Be Used to Identify the Person Behind the Camera, Researchers Say

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Camera shake could one day be used to help track down people who record footage anonymously. Researchers say that footage captured by wearable cameras contain a “motion signature” that’s unique to the wearer — a hidden “fingerprint” of sorts.
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Bound by Law: A Comic Book That Will Teach You the Basics of US Copyright Law

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Want to learn the basics of US copyright law without having to spend eons going through imageless websites and backbreaking textbooks? Check out Bound by Law. It’s a comic book that translates abstract and confusing copyright laws into easy to understand “visual metaphors.”

By the time you’re through with the 72-page comic, you’ll know quite a bit about the basics of copyright law, including fair use, infringement, and public domain.
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Fear and Loathing in Bushnell, Nebraska

A confrontation while photographing a small town in rural western Nebraska. Or: why it helps to know your rights and the law.

Dec 08, 2014 · John B. Crane

Did You Know You Can Easily Check Children for Eye Cancer Using Flash Photography?

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A new ad campaign in the UK is using interactive posters to inform parents that they can easily check their child for eye cancer using flash photography.
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This is What Photos of the Night Sky Would Look Like if the Andromeda Galaxy Were Brighter

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What would the night sky look like if the closest spiral galaxy to us were as bright as the moon and visible in its entirety to the naked eye? The photo above offers a pretty accurate look (Click the image for a larger version).

Created by Tom Buckley-Houston, the composite image shows the Andromeda galaxy’s actual size in the night sky with a huge boost in brightness.
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