Posts Tagged ‘hardware’

Lytro Branches Out from Photography, Offers Unprecedented Access to Their Tech for $20K

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The folks at Lytro have always believed that light field technology is the future, and not just for photography and storytelling. They believe that anything with a lens and a sensor can benefit from the technology, and with today’s announcement of the Lytro Platform, they’re opening up their proprietary tech to anybody who wants to partner up with them and expand light field into new markets. Read more…

The ‘Palette’ Customizable Control Interface Takes Your Post Workflow to the Next Level

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When engineers Calvin and Ashish got in touch with us to tell us about their upcoming Palette interface, we immediately got excited. That’s because a lot of people have thought up ways to speed up your post-processing workflow with everything from video game controllers to MIDI controllers, but none of them hold a candle to Palette’s potential. Read more…

A Tour of the Hardware Found in Modern Smartphone Cameras

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Want to take better photographs using your mobile phone camera? It helps to know what you are working with. I’ll assume you already know the basics for all kinds of photography (composition, exposure, focus and DOF, shutter speed, aperture, et cetera).

Once these are set, its time to get to know your equipment, and using that knowledge to your advantage.
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Adobe Shows off Its First Go at Hardware, The ‘Mighty’ Pen and ‘Napoleon’ Ruler

In addition to the Photoshop CC and Camera RAW announcements, the Adobe XD team also debuted something entirely different at the MAX conference: the company’s first shot at hardware. Coming in the form of a pressure-sensitive stylus and digital ruler, the two accessories are meant to take the creative brainstorming experience and shift it from pen-and-paper to pen-and-tablet.

In the video preview above, Adobe’s VP of Product Experience, Michael Gough, introduces the two products — code named “Mighty” and “Napoleon” — and walks you though the experience of using them. Read more…

Dissecting an $18 Digital Camera to Show How They Work

Here’s a dissection video for those of you who like photography better than biology. It’s a Khan Academy lesson that offers a glimpse into how digital cameras work on the inside. The camera being dissected is a Vivitar V25, a 2.1 megapixel camera that you can pick up for around $18 from places like Walmart. Although it’s basically the digital equivalent of a disposable camera, the camera still shares some things in common with higher-end digital cameras. You might be able to learn an interesting thing or two about how your own camera works.
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Canon 1D X and 1D C May Differ in More Than Firmware After All

Last month we wrote that DSLR blog EOSHD had learned from at least one Canon rep that the upcoming 1D C cinema DSLR was essentially a 1D X with tweaked firmware. This would mean that the 1D X is also capable of 4K video with “no heat or bandwidth issues.” However, that claim is now being challenged by Canon Rumors, which writes that the cameras do in fact have some important hardware differences as well.
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Canon’s 1D C 4K Cinema DSLR is Simply a 1D X with Different Firmware

If you thought the design and hardware specs of Canon’s upcoming 4K-capable 1D C are strangely similar to the company’s flagship 1D X, you’re right: the two models feature identical hardware loaded with different firmware. At Photokina 2012, DSLR filmmaking blog EOSHD spoke to Canon representatives, who confirmed this fact to be true. They write,

The 1D C is a 1D X with a 4K firmware update. Canon’s man told me that the only hardware change was to do with the flash sync jack […] So essentially the 1D X hardware – sensor, processor, everything – is capable of 4K video, 100%, no heat or bandwidth issues either.

What’s crazy is how much the difference in firmware affects the camera’s price. With a suggested retail price of $15,000, the 1D C more than doubles the 1D X’s price tag of $6,800.
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Lower ISO Doesn’t Always Lead to Higher Quality Images

When learning about ISO, you’ve probably heard that the lower the number, the lower the noise and the higher the image quality, but did you know that this isn’t always the case? The reason is something called the base (or native) ISO of a camera — the ISO achieved without amplifying the data from the sensor. This is usually somewhere between ISO 100 and ISO 200. Why does this matter? Bob Andersson of Camera Labs explains:

We all know that using high ISO numbers results in more sensor noise. More surprising, perhaps, is that using an ISO number below the native ISO number also degrades the image.

An interesting example is that when shooting on a Canon EOS 1Ds MkII, ISO 50 has roughly the same signal to noise ratio as shooting at ISO 800. This explains why the lowest possible ISO numbers can only be accessed through custom functions on some cameras.

Know your Base (or Native) ISO (via Reddit)


Image credit: Photograph by Filya1

Nikon D5100 Carefully Dissected, Found to Have “4 Billion” Screws

If you’ve ever wanted to know what the guts of a Nikon D5100 look like, iFixit just published a meticulously documented teardown of the camera. Aside from pointing out the various parts found in the body, an interesting conclusion the iFixit team came to was that the D5100 has a horrible “Repairability Score” of 2/10, where 10 is easiest to repair. The reason? “Approximately 4 billion screws hold the device together” (They’re exaggerating, of course).
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Helpful Guide on Configuring Photoshop for Optimial Performance

Photoshop is a pretty resource intensive program that can slow down to a crawl when you’re working with large and/or many files. Aside from beefing up your hardware specs to provide the program with more memory or disk space, there’s also a number of Photoshop and operating system preferences you can adjust to make sure the program runs as smoothly and quickly as possible. The Photoshop performance team recently published a helpful guide with 19 adjustments you can make, which range from optimizing cache level to turning off thumbnail display.

Adobe Photoshop CS5 performance (via John Nack)


Image credit: Photoshop CS3 – Proof Setup by Brajeshwar