Posts Tagged ‘astronaut’

It’s Official: The First Instagram From Space Has Been Posted

Taking one small step for photography (or is it ‘a photography’?) and one giant leap for Instagram, the first Instagram post from space was posted this past Monday by an astronaut currently residing at the International Space Station. Read more…

Exercise with a View: Check Out What ISS Astronauts See When They Bench Press

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NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio just arrived on the ISS last week (with the Olympic torch in tow, no less), and even though he wasn’t one of the astronauts who got to take the Olympic torch for a spacewalk/photo shoot, he wasted no time starting to upload photos from orbit.

All of the photos he’s uploaded (gallery below) are awesome for one reason or another, but one in particular has gotten a bunch of attention. Uploaded yesterday, the photo above shows the view Mastracchio and his fellow astronauts have while exercising on the ISS. Read more…

Houston, We Have a Problem: Astronaut’s Camera Floats Away Into Space

If you’ve gone to see the blockbuster hit Gravity in theaters, you’ll recall several moments when Sandra Bullock’s character nearly lost something into the abyss of space — be it a drill or a screw, everything needs to be strapped down because the slightest movement will send it careening into the unknown.

Well, that was Hollywood, but the real deal did actually happened to astronaut Sunita Williams back in 2006 when her camera just up and floated away from her during a 7-hour space walk. Read more…

Iconic NASA Space Walk Photos Continue to Inspire

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One of the key challenges in environmental portraiture is finding the right balance between subject and setting. Zoom in too close, and you lose the magic of location. Too wide, and it’s not a portrait anymore.

There are times, however, when you have to forget the rules. Like when you’re orbiting 150 miles above the Earth and one of your colleagues is about to take the first ever untethered space walk. Read more…

Peer Into Early Astronaut Spacesuits With These X-Ray Photographs

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When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped out onto the surface of the Moon, it wasn’t technically a military triumph, but it might as well have been. On July 20, 1969, the United States effectively routed the Soviet Union in the Cold War conquest of space. The suits that the astronauts wore, with the Stars and Strips splashed across the left shoulder, left no doubt as to who the victors were.
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Lightning Storms Photographed From High Above in Space

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Hey aspiring storm chasers — want to dramatically improve your lightning shots? Try getting an elevated view. Like about 400 miles up. That’s the approximate orbital height above Earth of the International Space Station, which is producing an impressive library of images showing what lightning looks like from way above.

The latest (shown above), captured July 21 by astronaut Karen Nyberg, shows an early-morning storm lighting up the clouds over Southern California.
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Photographing Earth from the Cupola on the International Space Station

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NASA’s Image of the Day today is a photograph showing one of the best photo op spots to be found on the International Space Station: the Cupola module. The image (shown above) shows astronaut and flight engineer Chris Cassidy pointing a Nikon DSLR and 400mm lens out one of the Cupola’s windows to photograph some location on Earth 250 miles below him.
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Astronaut Chris Hadfield Explains How to Take Pictures of Earth from Space

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has been serving as one of the International Space Station’s resident photographers. Every day he posts beautiful photographs showing what our planet looks like from orbit to his Twitter account, @cmdr_hadfield.

Today the Canadian Space Agency released the video above, in which Hadfield takes the time to explain how to best photograph Earth’s landscape from 400km (~250 miles) above the surface.
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Time-Lapse Shows What Earth Looks Like to Astronauts on the ISS

We shared this time-lapse by photographer Bruce W. Berry yesterday in a post about NASA astronaut photography from the International Space Station, but we’d like to share about it a little more about it since it’s something that definitely deserves its own post.
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A Birds-Eye View Photo of Space Shuttle Discovery’s First Launch

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NASA’s Space Shuttle Discovery’s first launch was back on August 30th, 1984 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During the event, astronaut John W. Young was flying nearby in a Shuttle Training Aircraft, which astronauts use to assess weather conditions prior to launches and landings.

Shortly after Discovery lifted into the air, Young pulled out his camera and snapped the above picture-perfect photograph of the orbiter climbing into space. He managed to catch the shuttle and its fiery trail framed by the reflection of the sun on the Atlantic Ocean. You can find a much higher resolution version of this photograph here.


Image credit: Photograph by John Young/NASA