tiltshift

Hands-On with the ROGETI TSE Frame for the Canon 24mm II Tilt-Shift Lens

I have stitched many panoramas, including those I took with my Canon 24 mm TS lens by shifting the lens from side to side. The TS lens gives easy-to-stitch frames. One uncontrolled element that remains in that case is the parallax shift because the lens position changes. Although that may go unnoticed in landscape panoramas, it is still there.

Why to Use Tilt Shift Lenses for Product Photography

Many people think of tilt shift lenses as something only used by specialist architectural photographers. Some actually don’t realize that they can do more than the tilt shift miniature effect emulated by the Photoshop filter (although it can give some fun results!)

The Tilt-O-Matic is a 3D-Printed Tilt-Shift Adapter

I’ve been making tilt-shift lenses for a while now, and they’re a bunch of fun to make and shoot with. I don’t think I need to sell you on the creative possibilities of this type of photography and videography.

Make a DIY Selective Focus Lens with a CV Boot

Iranian photographer and camera tinkerer Alireza Rostami wanted to shoot tilt-shift photos but found the specialized lenses too expensive, so instead he decided to make himself a selective focus lens using a cheap CV boot.

This Is a Fully-Functional 3D-Printed Canon EF to RF Tilt Adapter

Redditor Whomstevest has designed and 3d-printed a fully-functional Canon EF to RF tilt adapter and provided the design so that you can build your own at home. The adapter allows any Canon EF lens to adapt to an RF body and features infinity focus, 7 degrees of tilt, and 180 degrees of rotation.

This Tilt-Shift Photo of Andromeda Was Shot Using a DIY Adapter

The Royal Observatory Greenwich’s Insight Investment 2020 Astrophotographer of the Year, Nicolas Lefaudeux, has revealed his technique and the simple DIY adapter that made his award-winning image of the Andromeda galaxy possible.

I Shot Tilt-Shift Photos of San Francisco

My name is James D. Lee, and I'm a photographer based in Oakland. I recently got around to posting four years worth of selected photos shot in and around the San Francisco Bay area strictly on tilt-shift lenses. I completed this project while working full-time marketing/photography positions.

Turn a Cheap Vintage Lens into a DIY Selective Focus Lens for $10

Lensbaby's creative selective focus lenses like the Composer Pro will run you around $400; even the relatively affordable Spark costs $90. If all of that sounds too expensive for your taste, you should definitely check out this hacked version Mathieu Stern created for just 30 bucks!

Tilt-Shift Lenses: How They Work and How to Use Them

Everybody knows tilt-shift lenses can be used to get a "miniature" effect, but many photographers are oblivious to their other, more traditional applications, and even fewer understand exactly how these lenses work. The folks at LensPro ToGo are here to clear things up.

A Quick Introduction to Shooting with a Tilt-Shift Lens

A while back I got my hands on my first tilt-shift lens. Since then I have carried it with me nearly every day, grocery shopping and subway riding – you name it. It’s quite a special and fascinating piece of glass even having aged 43 years.

Tutorial: A Basic Explanation of What a Tilt-Shift Lens Is and How it Works

Tilt-shift lenses are nothing short of optical magic... or so it seems. But as their namesake implies, they actually achieve this 'magic' through the use of two clever movements in the lens.

In the short tutorial above, Vincent Laforet, a Canon Explorer of Light and well-known photography educator, explains just how those two components work and how they dramatically impact the look of an image.

Quick Tutorial Shows You How to Create a Tilt-Shift Effect in Photoshop

Tilt-shift images can be made one of two ways: one is to capture them in-camera using a tilt-shift lens, and the other is to create the effect in post-production by using a clever blurring technique.

One isn't necessarily better than the other -- each has its own time and place -- but more often than not, creating the effect in post-production is the most convenient (read: cheapest) method.