sound

See Airflow on Camera in This Awesome Harvard Demonstration of Schlieren Optics

Schlieren flow visualization and photography is one of those things that is just too cool. Using an optical trick, it allows a camera to capture, "small changes in the index of refraction in air." In other words, it can see anything that affects airflow: heat, sound waves, or just plain old air currents themselves.

And the video above, uploaded at the beginning of this year by the Harvard Natural Sciences Lecture Demonstrations YouTube channel, is one of the most fascinating demonstrations of Schlieren optics we've ever seen.

Chirp Lets You Send Photos from Device to Device Using Sound

The thinking behind the new Android and iOS app Chirp is that if animals in nature communicate through sound, machines should too. And so, the four person Animal Systems team created an app that does just that: no bluetooth, no email, no 'bumping' -- images and other files are sent using only 2-second sound clips.

Mhoto Automatically Generates Music for Your Pics Based on a Photo’s Content

It might not be quite a trend yet, but associating sound with photos isn't new either. Whether we're talking about interesting photographs created with sound (like Martin Klimas' paint photos) or about a camera that captures both sound and light, the idea of pairing sight and sound in photography has come up before.

Mhoto is a company with an idea along those same lines, only instead of capturing the sounds happening at the moment you take a photo, the company's tech creates music based on a photo.

Eighty Dollar DIY Sound Blimp Doubles as a Poor Man’s Underwater Housing

A couple of days ago, we shared a great little DIY project by Phoenix-based photographer Dan Tabár. Since he sometimes has to shoot on quiet soundstages where camera noise is not an option, he created a makeshift sound blimp for his Nikon D800 for only about $80 -- a professional sound blimp would have run him closer to $1,000.

As it turns out however, his DIY creation has another function. As you can see from the test video above, it doubles as a poor man's underwater housing!

This Handheld Camera Captures Sound In Addition to Light

You've probably heard of cameras that can detect wavelengths of light that human eyes can't, and also cameras that can detect heat in a scene, but have you ever heard of one that can capture sound? That's right: scientists at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have created a portable sound camera that's sensitive to sound waves.

Leica M: The Standard for Silent Shutters in United States Courtrooms

If you've ever shot with a Leica M rangefinder, you probably know how effective the camera can be for stealthy shooting. After all, there's no mirror that needs to swing out of the way like there is in a DSLR, so the main sound you'll hear is the soft click of the shutter curtain flapping open to expose the film or sensor.

It's not just Leica aficionados that appreciate the silent shutter: did you know that the Leica M is held as the standard for silent photography in courtrooms across the United States?

Sound Painting Photographs with Paint and Speakers

Photographer Martin Klimas, whose porcelain figurine photos we shared yesterday, has a series of photographs that look like 3D Jackson Pollock paintings. He spent six months photographing portraits of sound by playing music through a speaker that's crowned with paint. Klimas dials up the volume and then photographs the paint coming alive from vibrations caused by the sound waves.

Triggertrap Lets You Trigger Your Camera with Anything You Can Think Of

We have a bit of a scoop for you today: there's going to be a new Kickstarter-funded gadget announced on Thursday called the Triggertrap. It's a pretty nifty universal camera trigger that can trigger your camera's shutter with anything you can think of using a built-in intervalometer, a laser trigger, a sound sensor, and an Aux input that you can connect custom triggers to:

Think about it: You press your car horn, it takes a photo. Your phone rings, it takes a photo. The sun rises, it takes a photo. Anything is possible - and that's why this camera trigger is so eminently hackable and exciting to experimental photographers all over the world!

There's also a private sneak-peek of the Kickstarter video over on Vimeo. The password is TriggerTrap123.