projector

How I Converted My Afghan Box Camera Into a 4×5 Slide Projector

I have been shooting 4x5 color transparencies or commonly known as color slide film for many years but the best that I could enjoy them was to put them on the light table and viewing them through a loupe. Unlike my 35mm and 120 slides, I have never seen them projected big simply it is not easy to locate a 4×5 slide projector.

Shooting Cyberpunk Flapper Girl and Other Photographic Mashups

It’s a rare occasion when I do a team collaboration on a personal shoot. I typically prefer to work directly with the model, having them bring their own wardrobe and arrive with their hair and makeup already done. It not only saves time and is easier to coordinate but I also love the challenge of coming up with a cohesive theme for the shoot, basing my techniques, lighting, and color palette on the items that they brought with them.

Exquisite Geometry: A Wacom and Projector Photo Shoot

This was my first time working with Amber. In preparation for the shoot, I told her the same thing I tell all of my models: bring 4-6 different outfit options and have hair and makeup ready when they arrive.

This $70 Old Projector Lens Captures Intense Swirly Bokeh

The Carl Zeiss Kipronar 120mm f/1.9 is a vintage cinema projector lens that was designed to beam images rather than capture photos, but you can mount it to modern cameras using adapters. Photographer Mathieu Stern created a homemade adapter after buying the lens for $70 and has been delighted by the "insane swirly bokeh" that the lens produces.

How to Use a Projector as a Lighting Tool for Creative Portraits

In my opinion, there’s an extra layer of believability -- a tangibility, if you will -- to using practical effects as opposed to relying heavily on post-production. Post work is limited by the breadth (or lack thereof) of imagination, which is why I try to get as much as I can in-camera.

I Mounted an Anamorphic Projector Lens to My DSLR

I've recently become obsessed with the idea of shooting (something close to) true, 2.35:1 ratio CinemaScope anamorphic on my DSLR camera. This is pretty easily done if you can spend $1,000+ on an anamorphic lens made specifically for a DSLR camera... but I don't have that kind of cash, so I went another route.

After some research, I found that other DIY filmmakers are re-purposing old film projection lens, typically used in movie theaters, to "correct" the compressed anamorphic image into what we see on the screen as 2.35:1 CinemaScope.

Projector Brought Into the Forest Turns Nature Into a Glowing Wonderland

3D projections are often used nowadays to create eye-popping visuals on flat surfaces such as the sides of buildings or on basketball courts, but could the same concept be done out in the wild where things aren't flat and orderly? Photographer Tarek Mawad and animator Friedrich van Schoor recently decided to try it out.

What resulted is the video above, titled "Projections in the Forest". The two artists spent six weeks illuminating various things in nature with a powerful projector and then capturing the results on camera.

Is Lomography Preparing to Unveil a Movie Projector?

Lomography has low-fi imaging fans all aquiver thanks to a tease for an upcoming mystery product.

The Lomo news page merely shows a hand on a plastic crank, accompanied by an audio file that most listeners liken to the clicking sound of an old movie projector. (Sounds more like a playing card in a bicycle wheel to these ears, but a Lomography bicycle would just be too much to hope for.)

Light Blaster Turns Your Flash and Lens Into a Slide Projector

Earlier today, the folks over at DIYPhotography announced a revolutionary new product that they believe will "push your creative potential to the max." It's called the Light Blaster, and it's a light modifier that, with some help from one of your lenses and a speedlight, can project a 35mm slide or transparency into your image the moment you click your shutter.

This Tiny Silver Pendant Can Beam Your Favorite Photo Onto a Wall

Back in 2010, we shared how artist Luke Jerram had created a wedding ring that can project tiny slide photographs when placed in front of a light source. After seeing that idea, Cambridge-based engineer John Ding decided that he wanted to make something similar for his sweetheart, Becky.

Ding spent the next two years designing a silver pendant that can project a photograph. He ended up creating what he calls the "Projecting Pendant."

Light-Painting with a Blizzard by Pointing a Projector at the Falling Snow

Earlier today, we showed you a number of time-lapse videos of Winter Storm Nemo that were created by people who were stuck indoors due to the heavy snowfall. New York-based photographer Brian Maffitt was also stuck indoors and he also turned to photography, but instead of shooting time-lapse photos, he turned to a different technique: long-exposure light painting.

His technique is rather interesting: instead of a flashlight, Maffitt projected a movie onto the falling snow in order to light up the snowflakes.

Photos of Faces Projected Onto Trees

Clément Briend is a French photographer who photographs images being projected onto various surfaces in various spaces. For his project titled Cambodian Trees, he traveled to the Kingdom of Cambodia and photographed trees that had faces of the nation's deities projected onto the leaves.