cropsensor

Will Canon Scrap the EOS M Mirrorless Lineup and EF-M Mount?

The announcement has landed and it's now official: Canon has released an APS-C RF-mount camera. In fact, it hasn't just released one - but two - in the form of the R7 and R10. It might seem strange, given that Sony and Nikon have had APS-C models for some time, but this is a big deal because Canon already has the EF-M mount and EOS M APS-C mirrorless range. This begs the question, is Canon about to scrap the EOS M line?

Canon EOS R10

Canon EOS R10 First Impressions: A Lot of Camera for $1,000

Canon's first APS-C mirrorless cameras are here, three and a half years after its first full-frame RF-mount option. After a brief time with what is effectively the Rebel replacement, there is a lot of camera here for $1,000 when it comes to the new Canon EOS R10.

Pentax K-3 Mark III Review: An Excellent, Expensive DSLR

Pentax put a lot of time and effort into making the K-3 Mark III, and it shows: it's a huge leap in tech for a DSLR. But it's still a DSLR in a mirrorless world, and that perception combined with a premium price might hold back Pentax's latest $2,000 APS-C camera.

Canon EOS M50 Mark II Coming Soon, Key Specs Leaked: Report

Over the past few days, rumors that Canon is preparing to release an EOS M50 Mark II have been all-but-confirmed by dealer product listings. The camera is almost certainly going to be unveiled very soon, and now, we have a pretty good idea about the key specs as well.

Tokina Unveils New 11-20mm f/2.8 Zoom Lens for Crop Sensor DSLRs

As promised back in March, Tokina has just the ATX-i 11-20mm f/2.8 CF: an ultra-wide angle zoom lens for crop-sensor DSLRs from Nikon and Canon. With a fixed f/2.8 aperture and affordable price tag, it should prove to be a very popular option for APS-C users.

Sensor Size Comparison: MF vs Full Frame vs APS-C vs Micro Four Thirds

JP Morgan and Kenneth Merrill over at The Slanted Lens have put together an in-depth sensor size comparison that will definitely spark some conversation. They've compared medium format, full-frame, APS-C and Micro Four Thirds, in a side-by-side shootout—taking identical photos and making large prints to see how the image quality and dynamic range compares across formats.