Posts Tagged ‘privacy’

Street Photography in Saudi Arabia Could Lead You Straight to Jail

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If you’d like a long and fruitful career as a street photographer, Saudi Arabia might not be the most welcoming place for you to pursue it. Shooting public photos and sharing them online is becoming more and more popular in the Middle Eastern kingdom, but many practitioners are unaware that the country’s strict cybercrime law could bring down huge fines and even jail time for their snapshots.
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Tip: Easily Remove Geotag Data Using Mac’s Preview and Windows’ Properties

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If you’re not comfortable with the idea of uploading photos to the Web with geotag data baked into the file, there are some easy ways you can scrub the data to protect your privacy. Both Mac and Windows computers offer simple solutions for quickly removing sensitive location info from your photo files.
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UK Ad Campaign Warns Kids About the Dark Side of Sharing Too Much in Photos Online

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As photo sharing becomes one of the fastest growing niches in social media, a new British advertising campaign is warning kids and their parents about the dangers of sharing too much through online photo services.
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Hackers Find that Fingerprints Can Be Stolen Through Public Photos

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As the quality of cameras becomes better and better, there’s a new security issue emerging that you may have not thought about: fingerprints being stolen from photos.

Hackers are reporting that a person’s fingerprints can be reproduced using public photos that show their hand.
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Deleted but Not Gone: How to Keep Your Photos and Files From Falling Into the Wrong Hands

We’ve published a number of posts in the past on how you can recover photos that were accidentally deleted from your computer or memory card. But what about when you delete a photo and expect it to actually be gone forever?

The ease with which deleted files can often be recovered means that you should be careful when selling or tossing hard drives or memory cards — your photos and files might end up falling into the wrong hands if someone decides to try data recovery.
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Google Ordered to Pay Woman After Capturing Her Cleavage with Street View Cameras

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A Canadian judge has ordered Google to pay a Montreal woman for the violation of her privacy after she found an embarrassing photograph of herself on Google Street View. Google’s automated cameras had captured the woman sitting on her doorstep, leaning forward with a portion of her cleavage exposed.
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California Updates Invasion of Privacy Law to Ban the Use of Camera Drones

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In a bill meant to bring California’s privacy laws into a drone-heavy 21st century, the state just signed an act into law that will make it both illegal and very expensive for anybody seeking to invade someone else’s privacy by taking photos of them with a camera drone. Read more…

Yovo Photo Sharing App Uses Slatted Fence Optical Trick to Prevent Screenshots

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In the ongoing app battle to keep private photos safe and sound from unintended recipients (and the general public), a new app called Yovo – You Only View Once – brings an interesting technology to the table.

It’s called D-fence, and is based around the idea that your eyes can see what’s behind a slatted fence as you’re driving by at a high speed.
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iPhone Case Looks to Keep Away Prying Eyes, Eases Privacy Concerns

This is the iPatch, a cheekily-named iPhone case hoping to add an added layer of privacy to your mobile device(s). Currently seeking crowdfunding on HeadFunder, iPatch as an iPhone case with a built-in slider for the front and back cameras that allows you to manually cover them when not in use.

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Here, Look: An iOS App for Creating Quick, Disposable Photo Albums to Show Friends

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There are those dreaded moments in everyone’s life when you hand your phone over to someone to show them a collection of images you’ve saved or captured on your phone, only to have them continue swiping well past what you intended them to, possibly wandering into dangerous territory.

This, however, could become an issue of the past thanks to a new iOS app called Here, Look. Read more…