Posts Tagged ‘photos’

Looking at the Land: Landscape Photogs Explain the “Why” Behind Their Shots

Andy Adams of FlakPhoto has an interesting new digital exhibition titled Looking at the Land — 21st Century American Views that features 88 landscape photographs captured around the United States since 2000. What’s neat is that each of the images is accompanied by an explanation of “why” it exists. Adams asked each of the photographers the same questions, with the main one being, “Why did you photograph this place?”
Read more…

Photographer Makes a Name for Herself Photographing Tiny Waves

You’ve probably seen macro photographs of everything from bugs to blooms, but have you seen any of ocean waves? That’s the niche that Australian photographer Deb Morris has carved out for herself, and it’s working out quite nicely.
Read more…

BuzzFeed Sued for $1.3M After Publishing 9 Celebrity Photos Without Permission

Copyright infringement of photographs is anything but uncommon in this Internet age, as countless images are published all across the web every day without the owners’ consent. The problem is so widespread that virtually everyone gets away with it. The ones that don’t, however, are occasionally in for a good deal of pain.

Case in point: the viral-content aggregation site BuzzFeed is currently being sued for $1.3 million by a photo agency after publishing nine — that’s right, nine — of the agency’s photographs of celebrities.
Read more…

Photographs of Models of Photographs of Abandoned Buildings

Yesterday we featured an interesting example of digital photographs being reintroduced into the real world in another form (Google Street View photos as life-sized portraits), and now here’s another one. For her project “Broken Houses“, NYC-based photographer Ofra Lapid created realistic models of abandoned buildings using printed photos, and then photographed them on an infinite gray background.
Read more…

Social Photo Aggregator Pixable Acquired for $26.5 Million

Social photo aggregation service Pixable has been acquired by Singaporean telecommunications company SingTel for $26.5 million. The service helps in photo browsing and discovery by aggregating photographs from your various social networks (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Flicker) and using a special ranking system to only show you the interesting images. Billing itself as a “photo inbox”, users can also keep up with their friends’ photographs on-the-go using the company’s popular iOS and Android apps.
Read more…

New Leaked Photos of the Fujifilm X-E1 Shows the Flash, Top, and Back

Fujifilm’s soon-to-arrive X-E1 mirrorless camera is one slick-looking camera. The more affordable sibling of the X-Pro1 leaked itself some more today. New photos, originally published on Digicam-info, shows the pop-up flash that extends from the top of the camera, as well as clear views of the top plate and back. If you thought the front of the camera was beautiful, the good news is that the beauty extends all the way around.
Read more…

Leaked Photos of Fuji’s More Affordable X-E1 Mirrorless Camera

Back in July, we reported that Fuji was preparing to launch lower-end and higher-end siblings of its popular X-Pro1 mirrorless camera. We now both what the cheaper camera will be called, and what it’ll look like.

Named the “X-E1″, the camera had two of its product pictures leaked today through Digicame-info.
Read more…

First Photos of Nikon’s Upcoming High-End Coolpix P7700

Nikon Rumors published these first photographs of Nikon’s upcoming high-end compact camera, the Nikon Coolpix P7700. The camera is the successor of the P7100, which was announced on August 24, 2011. This latest model will reportedly arrive almost exactly one year later, on August 22nd, 2012.
Read more…

Long Lost Photos from China’s Past

It’s nearly impossible to find a photograph in China taken before 1970 — most images were destroyed or removed to other countries during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution.

A professor at Bristol University in the UK is running a project in search of these lost images, the BBC reports:

Such photographs are exceptionally rare in China. The turbulent history of the 20th Century meant that many archives were destroyed by war, invasion and revolution. Mao Zedong’s government regarded the past as a “black” time, to be erased in favour of the New China. The Cultural Revolution of the late 1960s finished the job.

“If you were at all savvy,” says (Professor Robert) Bickers, “you realised early on that you had to destroy your own private family records, before the Red Guards came and found evidence of your bourgeois, counter-revolutionary past, when you might have drunk coffee in a café bar, à la mode.”

Read more…

Unseen Portraits of ’60s Icons Found in Late Photographer’s Closet

Jack Robinson was a quiet man who mostly kept to himself, which explains why it was his boss, Dan Oppenheimer, who was left to take care of his estate when he passed. Little did Oppenheimer realize, however, that when he opened the closet in Jack Robinson’s incredibly tidy apartment, he would find a collection of pristine portraits of celebrities that Robinson shot in his early days as a commercial photographer for Vogue.

As it turns out, Robinson had acquired over 150,000 prints of famous ’50s, ’60s and ’70s icons ranging from Joni Mitchell to The Who before falling victim to alcoholism and moving to Memphis, leaving that life behind. And now interested parties will be able to get their hands on more of Robinson’s work than ever before in a book titled: Jack Robinson On Show: Portraits 1958-72. If you’re interested in seeing more of Robinson’s portraits, pay a visit to his online archives.

The Jack Robinson Archive (via NPR via Coudal Partners)