Posts Tagged ‘microscope’

Captivating TED Talk on the Unseen Worlds that Time-Lapse, Microscopic Imagery and Slow Motion Reveal

The intersection of Science, Technology and Art, at least according to renowned filmmaker and time-lapse photographer Louie Schwartzberg, is curiosity and wonder. And in the TED talk above, he makes the case for how few things pique that curiosity and inspire that wonder like the “hidden miracles of the natural world” that time-lapse, slow motion and microscopic imagery reveal. Read more…

Tiny Lens Attachment Turns Smartphones Into Microscopes

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We’ve seen mobile phone lens attachments and hacks that help you to take macro photos with your smartphone, but never before have we seen one that helps capture micro images. Read more…

Breathtaking Microscope Photos of Moth & Butterfly Wings

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Birdwing butterfly vein junction

The thing about nature is that, if you look close enough at just about anything, you’re bound to find a beauty and symmetry that defies description. In the case of Linden Gledhill‘s microscope photos of butterfly wings, he simply discovered another level of beauty in something that already captures many of our imaginations. Read more…

Captivating Microscopic Time-Lapse Video Captures the Formation of Snowflakes

This is just plain beautiful, no matter which way you slice it. Using the magic of time-lapse photography and microscopy, Vyacheslav Ivanov captured the formation of those ice crystals we call snowflakes that caused so much grief in the northeastern US over the past several weeks. Read more…

Microscopic Sand Photography Reveals the Breathtaking Beauty Hiding at the Beach

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Next time you’re at the beach, forget about the sunset or the crashing waves or the light that’s reflecting off of the water just so; if you want an amazing photo opportunity, all you have to do is look down at the stuff between your toes.

We’re talking, of course, about sand. And if you’re thinking that sand isn’t exactly photogenic we have a feeling your opinions will change once you feast your eyes on what Dr. Gary Greenberg saw when he put sand grains under the microscope. Read more…

Photographer Wins Big in Copyright Case, $1.6M Big

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It’s always nice when we stumble across a copyright case that doesn’t lead to wringing of hands and gnashing of teeth, rare as that might be. So when we ran across the news that a photographer pulled in $1.6 million in a copyright lawsuit, we just had to share it. Read more…

Turn Your Smartphone Into a Microscope and Macro Photography Stand for Only $10

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If you’ve followed PetaPixel for a little while, you’ll already know that a laser pointer’s focus lens can be put to good DIY use helping you take macro photos with your smartphone.

And even though you can simply find a way to secure the lens against your phone, a new Instructable shows you how to build a microscope stand/macro photography rig that will eliminate that particular problem altogether… and for only $10! Read more…

A Tiny Lens That Turns Your Smartphone Camera Into a Microscope

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Are ordinary macro lens attachments for your smartphone not enough for you? Want to zoom in closer? 22-year-old mechanical engineer Thomas Larson has just the lens for you. It’s called the Micro Phone Lens, and is a tiny little attachment that instantly lets you focus on and capture very small subjects.
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Hack Transforms Common Microscopes Into Gigapixel Superscopes

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Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have come up with an inexpensive way to boost the resolution of common microscopes by a factor of 100, allowing medical clinics in developing countries to conduct complex tests with existing equipment.
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Footage of Plants and Insects Magnified Thousands of Times

They look as if they’re a complete fabrication of one’s imagination, but they aren’t. German photographer Stefan Diller has managed to create worlds using microscopic images of plant and insect life, giving us a view of what our eyes can’t quite see. The technology, called nanoflight, is described as “a revolutionary new way to visualize structures of the microworld,” and has “the ability to move a virtual camera in eight degrees of freedom around the specimen.” Read more…