Posts Tagged ‘iso’

The Sony A7s Gets Taken for a Spin at ISO 409,600

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Sony announced the full-frame mirrorless A7s earlier this week. And while its 4K video capability was arguably the most touted feature, we were more intrigued by the 12-megapixel sensor that tops out at a ridiculous ISO of 409,600 … almost half a million ISO … in a mirrorless camera.

So, how does footage (and therefore images) look at 409,600 on the A7s? Well, Sony commissioned Den Lennie to show it off. Read more…

500px ISO: A New Visual Storytelling Blog for ‘Unique, Crazy and Beautiful’ Photos

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Earlier today, 500px officially launched 500px ISO: a story-telling blog consisting of 500px photos and original content created by a team of editors and photographers.

Striving to be “home to the best photo stories on the web,” 500px ISO wants to “surface the unique, crazy, and beautiful stories that result in the photos you see on 500px.” Read more…

Nikon Finally Pulls Back the Curtain on the D4s: A Less Noisy, Faster Version of the D4

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We’ve had teasers, we’ve had spec leaks, we’ve had image leaks and we’ve had more (ultimately inaccurate) spec leaks. And now, finally, we have an official announcement: the Nikon D4s has arrived. Read more…

Sony Upgrades QX10 & QX100 Lens Cams with Higher ISO, Shutter Priority and 1080p

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Right before Christmas, news broke that Sony had an update in the pipeline for the QX10 and QX100 lens cameras that would help them take better photos in low light and improve video quality. Well, that update has finally arrived. Read more…

Using ISO 100 for Concert Photography: Is it Possible?

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Have you ever heard of the “4 Seconds” Myth in Concert Photography? Well, probably not, because I made this phenomenon up as a play on words with the 4 Leaf Clover “Myth.” The 4 Seconds Myth talks about the fact that there’s a maximum period of time at just a few concerts when you can in fact shoot at crisp, noiseless ISO 100. Read more…

How Far We’ve Come: Comparing the ISO Capabilities of Nikon’s D70 and D600

After Toronto-based artist Kyle Clements put together his popular D600 sensor dust time-lapse, he began receiving many questions about how his new camera stacked up against the D70 he used up until that point.

Rather than continue to answer questions individually, he’s decided to start putting together YouTube videos for the most popular ones, starting with the ISO comparison above. Read more…

New Magic Lantern Improvement Adds 3 Stops of Dynamic Range to 5DIII and 7D

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All of the updates coming out of Magic Lantern’s camp recently have been RAW video related. And while there has been news enough on that front to keep us excited, we were happy to see something new coming from the ML team today.

Dubbed Dual ISO, Magic Lantern’s Alex (a1ex) has unlocked three full stops of dynamic range that the Canon 5D Mark III and 7D sensors couldn’t previously take advantage of. That brings total dynamic range to about 14 stops. Read more…

Rumor: Almost Official Canon 70D to Set a New Benchmark in ISO Performance

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As the Canon EOS 60D gets ready to make way for its big brother at an announcement expected later tonight, more info is leaking about the soon-to-be official 70D. In addition to the whole list of leaked specs and pictures from last week, we’re now hearing that the camera will set “a new benchmark” when it comes to ISO performance. Read more…

A Great Graphic for Understanding How ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed Work

Check out this awesome exposure triangle graphic found in this Exposure Guide tutorial on the fundamentals of exposure:

When these three elements are combined, they represent a given exposure value (EV) for a given setting. Any change in any one of the three elements will have a measurable and specific impact on how the remaining two elements react to expose the film frame or image sensor and how the image ultimately looks. For example, if you increase the f-stop, you decrease the size of the lens’ diaphragm thus reducing the amount of light hitting the image sensor, but also increasing the DOF (depth of field) in the final image. Reducing the shutter speed affects how motion is captured, in that this can cause the background or subject to become blurry. However, reducing shutter speed (keeping the shutter open longer) also increases the amount of light hitting the image sensor, so everything is brighter. Increasing the ISO, allows for shooting in lower light situations, but you increase the amount of digital noise inherent in the photo. It is impossible to make an independent change in one of the elements and not obtain an opposite effect in how the other elements affect the image, and ultimately change the EV.

If you’re just starting out in photography, do yourself a favor and work through the Photography Basics page over on Exposure Guide. It’s a fantastic resource.

Exposure – ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed Explained [Exposure Guide via Reddit]

An 8-Bit Explanation of the Three Basic Components of Exposure

Matthew Gore of Light & Matter created this beginner-friendly video tutorial on the three basic elements of exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. It’s explained with easy to understand illustrations and examples, and features graphics and sounds that are reminiscent of old 8-bit video games. You can also find a text-based version of the tutorial here.

The Three Basics of Photography (via Xatakafoto)