Posts Published in July 2010

Mila’s Daydreams Explores What a Baby Might Be Dreaming

Mila’s Daydreams is a creative photography project by Adele Enersen that’s similar to Jan von Holleben’s Dreams of Flying project that we featured a while back. Every day, when her baby daughter Mila takes a nap, Enersen imagines what her daughter might be dreaming about and stages a cute scene to capture it in a photograph.
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What Laser Light Can Do to Your Precious DSLR Sensor

We all know pointing your DSLR directly at the sun for extended periods of time isn’t too healthy for your sensor, but what about laser lights like the ones used at concerts? Turns out those can be even more lethal for your camera, even with very brief exposures.

Here are two videos shot with DSLR cameras that show a laser briefly passing over the camera and damaging the sensor permanently. Both were shot with Canon 5D Mark II cameras:

See the white line that appears immediately after the laser sweeps across?
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Panasonic Unveils World’s First 3D Camcorder, Announces 3D Lens

Panasonic just announced the HDC-SDT750, touting it as the “world’s first 3D consumer camcorder”. The exact claim is slightly dubious, since we featured a different one last month, but it’s definitely the first 3D camcorder unveiled by any of the major camera corps.

The camcorder uses an included 3D lens to record two separate images on its standard 1080p sensor, meaning the resulting 3D video only has a resolution of 960 x 1080. If you’ve got a spare $1,399 lying around, the camcorder will be available starting in October 2010.
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Nikon 24-70mm Lens Look-Alike Coffee Mug Finally Appears

Well… finally! A Nikon coffee mug has finally appeared on the Internets, months after the web went crazy over Canon look-alike mugs and cups. The black 24-70mm thermos coffee cup comes with a nifty gold box and drawstring bag to carry it around in, and sets you back $23 over at 100milligrams.

Like the black 24-105mm Canon cup, this does not appear to be an official product created by Nikon. However, diehard Nikon fans probably wouldn’t care anyways.

(via PDNPulse)

Interview with Udi Tirosh of DIYPhotography.net

Udi Tirosh is the blogger behind DIYPhotography.net and the creator of the Bokeh Masters Kit.


PetaPixel: Can you tell us about yourself and your background?

Udi Tirosh: I started photographing when I was in high school, and like lots of amateurs photographers I did photowalks, studio sessions and all the family events. At some point, I started DIYPhotography for the fun of it and thought of myself as a high-tech guy who photographs and has a site. DIYP has evolved beyond my expectations and for a long while I changed the order of my self definition to blogger who also takes pictures. Today, I am finding that I am slowly gaining photography as being first.
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Extreme Slow-Motion Video of Things Getting Destroyed

Philip Heron and James Adair filmed this super slow motion video of things smashed, shot, chopped and dropped with a Photron SA1.1 high speed camera.

Warning: This may make you want to shoot things (pun intended).

(via Laughing Squid)

Ansel Adams Photos Purchased for $45 at Garage Sale Worth $200 Million

Rick Norsigian, a painter based in Fresno, California, was browsing through a garage sale in 2000 when he came across two small boxes with 65 glass plate negatives. He was able to purchase the photographs for $45 after bargaining them down from $70. Now it turns out he made one of the biggest finds in photographic history.

Experts are now saying that the negatives were created by Ansel Adams between 1919 and the 1930′s — before Adams became famous — and that the photographs could be worth at least $200 million.

The previous owner purchased the plates at a warehouse salvage in Los Angeles prior to selling them to Norsigian.

TIME reports that although experts have concluded that the photos are indeed by Adams, some remain skeptical. Matthew Adams, the grandson of Ansel Adams, is reported as saying,

Mr. Norsigian has been claiming these negatives were made by Ansel Adams for many years. I am unaware of anyone knowledgeable agreeing with him.

Next time you’re at a garage sale or warehouse salvage, give those old looking negatives an extra hard look. You never know what you might find.

(via CNN)


Image credit: Garage Sale by Ben Saren

Nadia Camera Rates Photos As You Shoot

We’ve already got plenty of gadgets designed to facilitate photography: there’s auto-focus, face detection, and some crazy features in Photoshop that can effortlessly add and remove entire elements (and people) in photographs. So now why not have a camera that tells you whether you’re taking an aesthetically pleasing photograph?

Designer Andrew Kupresanin created this project camera that utilizes the Aesthetic Quality Inference Engine Acquine to judge photo quality even before you take a photograph. The screen in the back of the camera simply shows a percentage rating, in lieu of an LCD display. The camera is actually a Nokia N73 camera connected with a Mac over Bluetooth. Kupresanin seems to be using his experimental project to make a poignant statement about the automation of photography and aesthetics. Kupresanin says on his site:

Within pop culture and society artificial intelligence has been a topic that is approached with hope, fear, cynicism, curiosity and caution. However many intelligent devices have already been effortlessly absorbed into our culture and everyday lives.

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Novelty Tuna-Shaped Film Camera

This is probably not the most ergonomic camera body, but it puts fisheye into a whole different context.

Back in 1971, StarKist tuna sold promotional cameras in the shape of StarKist mascot Charlie the Tuna for $4.95 and three StarKist can labels. The camera, manufactured by Whitehouse Products, takes 126 cartridge film and accepts flashcubes on top of its head.

If you’re a collector, KEH Camera is selling a used Charlie Tuna camera for $79.

(via KEH Camera Blog)

British Royal Family Has a Flickr Account

The Royal Family is really getting into social media: in addition to their YouTube channel, Twitter, and series of iTunes podcasts, the Family now has a Flickr account which went live to the public this morning. Currently, the British Monarchy’s photostream contains 683 uploads of both recent and older historical photographs. According to an announcement from the Royal Collection, photos will be continually added to the account. The Flickr account launch was scheduled to coincide with the summer opening of Buckingham Palace. Some of the images featured on the photo-sharing site are to be featured in the exhibit, The Queen’s Year, which opens tomorrow at the Palace.