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AI-Created Art Cannot be Copyrighted, US Copyright Office Says

Artificial intelligence has gotten better and better at creating "art" in recent years -- algorithms are now capable of creating convincing "photos" of people and places that do not actually exist. It turns out those AI artworks cannot be copyrighted in the United States with the US Copyright Office.

Judge Rules Images of Enslaved Are Property of Harvard, Not Descendant

A Massachusetts judge has dismissed a woman's lawsuit claiming that she is the rightful owner of the images of an enslaved father and daughter and not Harvard, the New York Times reports. The judge cites common law that the content of an image cannot be used to claim ownership of that image, regardless of the subject.

Photographer Wins Lawsuit Against BuzzFeed, Sets Major DMCA Precedent

Last week, photographer Gregory Mango won an important lawsuit against online publication BuzzFeed; it's important, not because of the payout involved, but because of the precedent set by the court, which ruled that BuzzFeed was liable for 3rd party infringement of his photo because they removed his copyright info from the image.

Media Companies Can’t Just Steal Your Social Media Photos: Judge

With the explosion of social media and photo sharing, personal pictures commonly go viral and make their way onto major news websites, sometimes without the photographers' permission. But a judge has just ruled that media companies can't simply steal social media photos whenever they see fit.

Online Photos Can’t Be Used Without Permission, EU Court Rules

A Virginia federal court sparked quite a controversy among photographers last month when it ruled that copying photos found on the Internet is fair use. Now a European Union court has just issued a landmark ruling that states you can't simply republish a photo because it's freely accessible online -- you need the photographer's permission first.

States Can Force Online Retailers to Collect Sales Tax: Supreme Court

Camera gear is about to get more expensive for most online shoppers in the United States. The Supreme Court just ruled that states may force online retailers to collect sales tax on their behalf. While Amazon already does this -- it has a "nexus" in every state -- camera gear giants like B&H and Adorama will now have to follow suit.