publicdomain

How to Create Silly Animations from Old Public Domain Photos

Thank you to everyone who read the recent article about my short animations, and to all of the people who reached out to ask me for a tutorial. Since so many people were curious, I decided to put together a tutorial where I take you along for the ride while I create one of the animations from the original article.

Photographer Turns Public Domain Photos Into Funny Animations

Like many others, Swiss photographer and director Nicola Tröhler has had all of his jobs cancelled due to COVID-19. So, since he can't go out and take any photos, he decided to tap the public domain libraries in Switzerland and the US and work on his animation skills instead.

Paris Museums Put 60,000+ Historic Photos Online, Copyright-Free

Paris Musées, a group of 14 public museums in Paris, has made a splash by releasing high-res digital images for over 100,000 artworks through a new online portal. All the works were released to the public domain (CC0, or "No Rights Reserved"), and they include 62,599 historic photos by some of the most famous French photographers such as Eugene Atget.

Photos of 1930s New York City by Berenice Abbott

The Federal Art Project was a Depression-era program that launched in 1935 to fund projects by visual artists in the US. That same year, American photographer Berenice Abbott received funding for a "Changing New York" photo project to document New York City.

She shot 305 photos for the project between 1935 and 1939, and her work was published in a photo book and distributed to public institutions in New York.

Corbis Charges Hefty Fees for Freely Available Public Domain Photos

If you come across any photograph published in the US before 1923, you're free to use it for whatever purpose you'd like, with or without permission, and with or without attribution. Why? Because its copyright has expired and it's public domain.

Strangely enough, sometimes free public domain photos get sold as stock photos, and those who don't know any better may pay large sums to use something they could have used for free.

Flickr Now Lets You Add Public Domain Photos and Release Shots to the Public Domain

Last week SpaceX posted its photos to Flickr and released them to the public domain. Unfortunately for the company, Flickr didn't have any public domain designation they could use, so even though SpaceX founder Elon Musk said the photos were public domain, the images were shared under a Creative Commons license that required attribution.

That has now changed. Flickr announced yesterday that it has created two new options for members in the copyright dropdown panel: public domain and CC0, which allows users to release content to the public domain.

SpaceX is Now Publishing Its Photos Into the Public Domain Thanks to a Tweet

NASA is a government agency, so the photographs it creates are released to the public domain and can be used by anyone for any purpose. Now that private companies such as SpaceX are getting involved in space exploration and collaborating with NASA, the copyright of mission photos becomes a little more murky.

All that cleared up in a big way this past weekend: SpaceX is following NASA's lead and will now be releasing photos to the public domain.

Why Unsplash is Hurting Photographers

Launched back in 2013, Unsplash is a site which posts ten handpicked photos every ten days and these photos are absolutely free. By “free” I don’t mean “free to download” — they’re free to use everywhere and in any way you want. Commercially and whatnot.

Which is a great thing, right? Finally, a place with photos hip enough to use on a lifestyle blog or design agency’s website. I’ve seen hundreds of sites using them, including ecommerce. I’ve also seen them used in magazines, on T-shirts, in books and as prints. People are now earning money from unattributed Unsplash photos — everyone, it seems, but the photographers who took them.