handheld

Retouching-Photos-with-A-SteamDeck

Can You Edit Photos on a Steam Deck?

A little over a year ago, Valve announced a handheld gaming PC called the Steam Deck. In February of 2022, those who pre-ordered the device started to receive the handheld devices which have since had a huge impact on the gaming world. But what if you could do more than just play video games on the Steam Deck? What if it could run Lightroom or Photoshop? Would it be possible to edit photos on it?

The DJI Pocket 2 Gets Upgraded Sensor, Lens and Features

DJI's second generation of the Osmo Pocket is now called the Pocket 2 and brings performance upgrades along with the new name to the tiny stabilized 4K camera. As the name suggests, it's pocket-sized in physical dimensions, but DJI promises big performance despite that.

Video Stabilization Comparison: Lens IS vs In-Body IS vs Warp Stabilizer

How does Lens IS compare to using IBIS? And how do either of these compare to stabilization in post? These are the questions that Eric Stemen wanted to answer in his latest side-by-side comparison, which highlights the benefits and limitations of each stabilization method when shooting video handheld.

Olympus Shows Off 2000mm Reach by Shooting Mt. Fuji from 42 Miles Away

With the major Japanese trade show CP+ being cancelled over coronavirus concerns, Olympus has taken to YouTube to share the presentation it was planning to give at the show. The 45-minute presentation included an interesting look at how much reach the new M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm f/4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO lens gives when combined with the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20.

How to Shoot Handheld Focus Stacks for Macro Photography

Handheld focus stacking is a brilliant solution for many scenarios. It saves you all the troubles of using a focusing rail in the field and provides a maximum of flexibility. Whenever you need more depth of field than you can get with trading off image quality, this is the way to work around it.

This is a ’60-Second’ Handheld Photo of the Milky Way

Photographer Jonathan Usher of Wellington, New Zealand, recently created this photo of the Milky Way rising from the horizon near his city. But get this: he wasn't using a tripod or any other stabilization -- not even a rock. It's a "60-second exposure" shot handheld.

This Gorgeous 10-Second Milky Way Photo Was Shot Hand-Held

In an attempt to one-up photographer Aurel Manea, who shot these hand-held Milky Way photos with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II last week, New Zealand photographer Jonathan Usher took his own EM-1 II out for a hand-held long exposure. That's how he shot this unbelievable image: a hand-held 10 second exposure of the Milky Way.

You Can Shoot the Milky Way Hand-Held with the Olympus E-M1 Mark II

When it comes to optical image stabilization, it seems like nothing comes close to touching Olympus' OM-D E-M1 Mark II. As one photographer recently discovered, the 5-axis optical stabilization is so good, you can actually shoot the Milky Way hand-held with this monster.

The Olympus E-M1 Mark II Can Capture Sharp 5 Second Exposures Hand-Held!

Olympus has said the only thing standing between the OM-D E-M1 Mark II and better stabilization is the rotation of the Earth—and so far, the camera's bite is living up to the bark. In fact, the 6.5-stop stabilization is so powerful, it looks like you can capture sharp hand-held 5 second exposures!