Ideas

 

Dysturb: Hard-to-Swallow Photojournalism Hits the Streets of Paris

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What do you do when the usual outlets for photographic media choose not to show images you risked your life to capture? What is the next best way to make sure the world sees what is really happening?

It’s these questions that led French photojournalist Pierre Terdjman and his buddies to create something called Dysturb, a project that plasters ignored, hard-hitting and hard-to-swallow photojournalism all over the streets of Paris. Read more…

State Park Using Hashtags & Social Media to Create a Time-Lapse of Wildfire Recovery


Hashtags are nothing more than a novelty byproduct of the 21st century, right? Wrong. At least that’s the case in the minds of the scientists behind a new project that takes advantage of photography, hashtags and social media to help crowdsource a time-lapse documentation of fire damage recovery. Read more…

5 Toys and Tricks to Improve Your Light Painting

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It’s easy to plateau when you’re experimenting with light painting photography, and as a result, this fun genre can often turn into a flash in the pan hobby.

And so, in order to help sustain your interest in what I think is a worthwhile endeavor and an under appreciated form of photography, I’ve decided to provide a few of the toys and tricks I’ve picked up in my experiences. These are things that have helped respire my interest in the past. Hopefully they’ll motivate you to continue experimenting as well. Read more…

DIY: Use a Little Plastic and an Old Filter to Create Cinematic Lens Flares

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As 3D printing becomes more easily accessible and cheaper to work with, more and more people are experimenting to see just how the technology can be used to improve and tweak their photography. One such tweak has been created and shared by Instructables user Jan_Henrik.

By putting together an unused filter casing and a 3D printed piece of plastic, he’s able to get some extra ‘pop’ in his photos and videos in the form of cinematic JJ Abrams-like lens flares. Read more…

Interactive Web App Makes Sure You Never Forget a Photoshop or Lightroom Shortcut

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When it comes to getting the most out your post-processing applications, you really want to know your shortcuts. The problem is, there’s so many within each program that it’s impossible to remember them all.

Of course, you can purchase keyboard overlays to give you a visual queue, but many shortcuts change from version to version, making the $10–40 piece of silicon useless in a year, not to mention the fact that many shortcuts change when combined with the “shift” or “ctrl” keys.

Well forget all that, because a gentleman by the name of Waldo Bronchart is here to save the day with a brilliant web application called the ‘Application Shortcut Mapper.’ Meant to be “a visual shortcuts explorer for popular applications,” this resource is a goldmine for photographers, as Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom are two of the first three apps implemented into the resource. Read more…

Hypnotic Slow Motion Footage of a Tattoo in the Making

You could take this video one of two ways. You could either use it as inspiration for a macro photography tattoo series that, if we don’t say so ourselves, would be really freaking cool if done right; or you could simply file it away as another mesmerizing slow motion video that’s good for distracting you for exactly two minutes and 50 seconds (plus however long it takes you to share it with any tattoo lovers on your Facebook friends list).

We’ll let you make the decision, but either way we hope you enjoy watching tattoo artist Gaëtan Le Gargasson slooooowwwwwlllyyy ply his needly trade on a willing human canvas… we definitely did.

(via Doobybrain)

Spice Up Your Photography Experiments with Homemade Holograms

If you’re looking for an interesting way to spice up your experimental photography a bit, Shanks FX has a little video you might find interesting. Showing off various methods of how to create holograms — or at least give the illusion of a hologram — Shanks uses glass, mirrors, fog, mist, steam and a projector to bring 2D images to life in a 3D world.

Many of the results shown in the video are very impressive, and could definitely be used to add a unique element to your photo work. Give the six minute video a watch, and if you end up creating a series of photos using these ideas, be sure to share it in the comments down below!

Photographer Benoit Paillé Captures Real Photos of the Virtual World of GTA V

Back in October 2013, we featured the work of Fernando Pereira Gomes, an artist who creates street photographs in the virtual video game world of GTA V. Montreal-based photographer Benoit Paillé also works in the same virtual world, except he takes his work one step further: he uses a real world camera.
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100 Cameras Will Photograph Berlin with Ridiculous 100-Year Exposure Times

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Long exposure photographs are usually measured in seconds or minutes. Use solargraphy, and you might measure in months or years. The longest we’ve heard of so far are photos spanning decades.

Well, those exposure times are relatively short compared to Jonathon Keats’s “century cameras”: they’re specially designed cameras that will take 100-year-long exposures!
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Photographer Oliver Blohm Processes His Polaroid Portraits Using a Microwave

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What do Polaroids and Hot Pockets have in common? 99.9% of the time nothing. But, thanks to Berlin-based fashion and portrait photographer, Oliver Blohm, there’s that .1% remaining. To create that .1%, he has literally developed a way in which to combine Polaroid film with a microwave to create some very… unique photographs.
Read more…