meteor

This Once-in-a-Lifetime Meteor Photo Was Captured by Accident

There are some types of photography that can be planned down to the tiniest detail. Capturing shooting stars? Not so much. This picture-perfect photo of a meteor is one of photographer Prasenjeet Yadav's most popular shots, but it's also perhaps his luckiest: it was captured accidentally while he was asleep.

Photographer Captures Rare Meteor Explosion While He Slept

Time-lapse photographer Matthew Vandeputte recently captured something truly awesome. While he was sleeping soundly in a cabin somewhere in Utah, the camera he set up earlier that evening captured the moment when a meteor entered the atmosphere and exploded, leaving behind a green trail of dust and ionized gas.

Yes, The Huawei P30 Pro Can Shoot the Milky Way (and Even Meteors)

My Huawei P30 Pro arrived at 4:30 pm on April 6th, and I knew the night sky in Mersing would be amazing for me to try out this low-light beast. I had read a lot of good reviews on P30 Pro, but I was still skeptical, so I booked a room at my regular resort on the same day and drove 3 hours to get there.

Photographer Captures Shooting Star Exploding in Front of a Comet

Montreal-based photographer François Guinaudeau went out a couple of nights ago to shoot Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner during the Perseid meteor shower. As he was capturing photos of the comet for stacking, a shooting star flew into the frame and exploded near the comet. Above is one of the photos that resulted.

This Photo Captures Lava, Milky Way, Meteor, and Moon in a Single Shot

Adventure photographer Mike Mezeul II captured something truly extraordinary a couple of weeks ago. While hiking around Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island of Hawaii one night in September, he managed to capture the moon, the milky way, a meteor, and flowing lava in a single frame.

This Time-Lapse Caught a Meteor Explosion and a 40-Minute Orange Plume

Photographer Nao Tharp of Los Angeles, California, just released this short video that shows something neat he captured on a freezing cold winter night back on December 12th, 2015. While shooting a time-lapse of the Geminid meteor shower at Red Rock Canyon State Park in California's Mojave desert, his camera caught a bright meteor explosion and a resulting orange glowing plume that lingered for about 40 minutes.

The video above shows the same explosion at different magnifications and playback speeds.

How to Take a Self-Portrait with a Shooting Star

With a little bit of patience and a whole lot of luck, I was able to capture this photograph of myself perched on a rock above the Pacific Ocean. When I set out to photograph the annual famed Perseids Meteor Shower last week, I had a specific goal of capturing a "selfie" photograph with myself in frame and hopefully a meteor streaking overhead (along with a variety of other images throughout the evening). My hope turned into reality in the wee hours of Wednesday morning.

Photographer Snaps Meteor Leaving a ‘Z’ in the Sky

A couple of nights ago, Hawick, UK-based photographer Sam Cornwell spent some time in the great outdoors taking pictures of the April Lyrids meteor shower that happens from April 16 to April 26 of each year. Just as he was about to call it quits and return home without a keeper, Cornwell captured the above photo of a huge "fireball" streaking across the night sky.

Milky Way Time-Lapse Captures Rare Glimpse of a Meteor Exploding in the Atmosphere

In mid-October, a meteor decided to explode in spectacular fashion in the night sky. Known as a 'bolide fireball,' a photographer named Ben Lewis was lucky enough to capture it and his video went viral the day after the event.

But he wasn't the only one with camera pointed towards sky, and for our money, we think photographer Wes Eisenhauer was fortunate enough to capture it better.