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Can You Spot the Snow Leopards in These Photos?

Snow leopards are a threatened species that live in extreme environments and are notoriously difficult to see and photograph. Photographer Ismail Shariff captured a series of photos showing just how difficult it is to spot a snow leopard in the wild.

Instagram Brings Back Its Classic Icons, Adds ‘Stories Map’ Feature

Instagram is celebrating its 10th anniversary this week with a couple of new features and a fun surprise. The photo sharing app has expanded its anti-bullying features, created a 'Stories Map' and calendar, and has added a hidden option that lets users roll back to one of its classic logos.

Chernobyl After HBO: Exploring the Hidden Places Tourists Don’t See

Last year, more than 120,000 tourists visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in 2020 that number is expected to double. Mass tourism has forever become a part of the Exclusion Zone, mostly because of the successful HBO series “Chernobyl.”

7 Hidden Lightroom Tricks You Might Want to Know

Educator Colin Smith of photoshopCAFE has 7 great tips for Lightroom users that might just surprise you and make your post production life a little easier. He previously shared 7 Photoshop tricks hidden in plain sight, and these Lightroom tricks are just as helpful.

There Are 550 Sheep in This Landscape Photo

The Internet is abuzz over a series of photographs by a farmer named Liezel Kennedy in Saskatchewan, Canada. The image above may appear at first glance to be a simple snapshot of a snowy Canadian countryside, but it's actually a photo showing how well sheep can blend into their surroundings in the wild. There are about 550 sheep in the photo.

A Time-Lapse Journey Into the Sewer System Beneath Manchester, England

Photographer CJ from substormflow is passionate about exploring sewer systems, and he wants to show the world the unique underground architecture that most people never get to see. The video above is a glimpse into the hidden system of old culverts and sewers beneath the bustling city of Manchester in England.

Camouflage Photo Series Shows Just How Well Snipers Can Hide in Plain Sight

We spend all day staring at pixels, but really, just how good is our vision when it comes to noticing the small details in photographs? Well, I can't speak on behalf of everyone, but using the tricky images below, you can get a good idea for yourself.

German artist Simon Menner created an interesting photo series that features military snipers hiding in various landscapes. The photos show just how well these highly trained individuals can blend into their surroundings, which vary from empty fields to rocky valleys.

Anti-Abuse Ad Uses Lenticular Printing to Show Alternate Photo to Kids

Last week we shared some photos from an awareness campaign by the Mexican organization Save the Children, which showed the "cycle of abuse" through powerful, hard-to-stomach photos of children growing into future abusers. The ads were meant to illustrate the statistic that 70 percent of abused children turn into abusing adults.

Spanish organization the ANAR Foundation (Aid to Children and Adolescents at Risk) recently released a campaign that makes similarly powerful use of photography, only they're taking advantage of the process of lenticular printing to send an offer of help to abused children without alerting their abusers, even if they're walking together.

Hacker Reportedly Finds Hidden Features in the Olympus OM-D EM-5

The Olympus OM-D EM-5 is a powerful little camera, but what owners are using these days many only be a portion of what the camera is fully capable of. 43 Rumors writes that an anonymous hacker is claiming to have hacked the camera using some firmware update trickery. What he or she found was quite interesting: hidden and locked features such as clean HDMI 4:2:2 output and focus peaking!

Mac Engineers Hid Photos of Themselves in Old Macintosh SE Computers

The people over at New York-based hackerspace NYC Resistor recently found an old Apple Macintosh SE on the side of a road in Brooklyn -- a computer that was manufactured between 1987 and 1990. They decided to do a little "digital archaeology", and came across something strange:

While digging through dumps generated from the Apple Mac SE ROM images we noticed that there was a large amount of non-code, non-audio data. Adam Mayer tested different stride widths and found that at 67 bytes (536 pixels across) there appeared to be some sort of image data that clearly was a picture of people. The rest of the image was skewed and distorted, so we knew that it wasn’t stored as an uncompressed bitmap.

After some investigation, we were able to decode the scrambled mess above and turn it into the full image with a hidden message from “Thu, Nov 20, 1986“.

After some further techie magic, they were able to unearth four black and white photographs showing the engineers that worked on building the computer for Apple 25 years ago.