foodphotography

Overcoming My Harshest Critic: Self Sufficient to a Fault

We were several weeks into the lockdown. My optimistic attitude told me that it was the perfect time to write a book. Commercial shoots canceled, personal engagements canceled, nothing but time at home for the foreseeable future. How hard could it be?

Tips for Better Holiday Food Photography

Sarah Crawford is an accomplished baker and food photographer most well known for her blog Broma Bakery and in conjunction with Adobe Lightroom has shared her tips for getting the most out your photos of holiday baked goods.

A Full Commercial Food Photo Shoot: From Concept to Shooting to Editing

In this 35-minute video, I go through my entire process of shooting for my commercial portfolio. During the COVID-19 lockdown, I have had more time to focus on my book, which will hopefully help get me back out there when everything opens up again.

How to Capture a ‘Dramatic’ Food Photo Using Cheap Gear

Food photographer Joanie Simon of The Bite Shot has put together a helpful tutorial that shows you how to capture "dramatic food photography" using an extremely cheap DSLR. Specifically, she picked up a used Canon Rebel T2i with a kit lens for just $200.

Instagram Has Changed Professional Food Photography Forever

Taking a look at popular images featuring food on Instagram, you'll see a pattern. Andrew Scrivani, a New York food photographer veteran puts it bluntly: "They are almost exclusively shooting from the top. Almost everything is a round dish of food and in a square, because Instagram is square, and a lot of it is on white or very light backgrounds, and white or very light plating, and consistently less and less propping."

Pro Food Photographer Debunks Viral ‘Food Styling Hacks’

Those "food styling hacks" videos that go viral online every few months might not be entirely truthful—in fact, they're often entirely misleading. Which is why professional food photographer Scott Choucino put together this video reacting to/debunking some of the most common hacks he's seen online.

Photography Challenge: Using a $3 TV Dinner to Capture 5-Star Food Photos

Photographer Taylor Jackson has started a new series on his YouTube channel called Photography Challenge, where he will (you guessed it) take on a different challenge every episode. And this week, he's been challenged to turn a $3 frozen TV dinner in professional food photography worthy of a 5-star restaurant.

Two Focal Lengths Every Prime Lover Should Own

In the world of photography, you’ll find people generally prefer primes or zooms. The main benefit to zoom lenses is that you can cover multiple focal lengths in one decent sized package. In saying this, there are some prime lenses that can work well for multiple purposes. Two of these are the 35mm and 85mm primes.

Tricks Food Photographers Use to Make Food Look Delicious

Food photographers have an arsenal of tricks up their sleeves to make food look delicious on camera. And more often than not, these hacks make use of non-edible products that aren't appetizing. Blossom has created an eye-opening video that reveals the dirty (sometimes literally) little tricks of food photographers.

How to Style Food for Photos: 10 Pro Tips and Tricks

I'm photographer Jay P. Morgan. In this 15-minute video, we’re joined by Ed Rudolph, a food photographer from the Los Angeles area. He’s going to share with us his top ten tips for styling food.

How to Shoot Photos of Flying Food

Want to learn how to create a "flying food" photo without actually making food travel through the air? Food photographer Skyler Burt of We Eat Together made this 5.5-minute tutorial on one way to freeze time and space.

$20 Work Light vs $900 Studio Strobe for a Food Photo

How does a $20 work light from a hardware store compare to a $900 studio strobe when it comes to food photography? Photographer Skyler Burt of We Eat Together recently decided to find out. He pitted a HDX 500w halogen work light against a $900 Elinchrom Pro HD 500W monolight.

10 Sneaky Tricks Used in Food Photos

The foods you buy in the store and at restaurants are never as tasty as they look in advertising photos, but what many people might not know is that you probably wouldn't enjoy eating the foods seen in those pictures. The reason is because commercial food photographers use all kinds of non-edible products to cleverly make food look delicious in front of a lens. Here's a 9-minute video on 10 of those tricks.