disaster

I Caught My Wedding Photography Nightmare on Camera

Being a wedding photographer for me is one of the best, if not the best, jobs in the world. As expected though, the best job in the world also has its negatives, and one of them is the reoccurring nightmares the night before a wedding day.

How a Photojournalist Captured a Shot in the Literal Heat of the Moment

If a fire broke out, and you could only grab one thing, what would it be? For many, that question will always stay hypothetical, but for the residents of Anonas Street in Santa Mesa, Manila, on one fateful day in 2020, it suddenly became the reality that would change their lives permanently.

An Insider’s Look at a Photo Workshop Disaster

I wrote an article in 2017 about bad photography workshops, and I made a promise to the community that I would never speak at, attend, or help promote a workshop again unless it was one I believed in wholeheartedly. I promised to do my due diligence when accepting speaking engagements and I promised that the events I did agree to speak at would be of the highest standards.

I Fell Into the Ocean While Shooting a Wedding

This is the story of how I fell into the ocean while shooting a wedding. I was contracted to shoot a wedding for a couple named Erin and Ben. It was poised to be a beautiful day: we had great weather and everyone involved was super excited as the wedding ceremony was to be out on a small island just off the coast of Pender Harbour, North of Vancouver, Canada.

I Shot Aerial Photos of Puerto Rico in Ruins After Hurricane Maria

On September 20th, the Category 4 storm Hurricane Maria made landfall on Puerto Rico, making it the most powerful hurricane to hit the island in almost 90 years. With catastrophic winds of 155 mph, Maria devastated the Island causing severe damages to homes, buildings, agriculture, and infrastructure.

Saving Priceless Family Photos from Hurricane Harvey Floodwaters

Record-smashing rainfall brought by Hurricane Harvey recently flooded thousands of homes across the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast, including my grandmother’s home in Southwest Houston. Despite being located in a flood-prone area, her single-story house had never flooded before in more than five decades of her living in that house.

Photographer Returns to Chernobyl 30 Years Later with Former Residents

Chernobyl and the nearby city of Prypyat is a common subject, particularly for URBEX photographers who go there to document the deserted town. But photographer Alina Rudya's project/book Prypyat Mon Amour is different. Her family was there when the infamous accident happened, and when she returned to photograph the people whose lives were changed, she returned 'home' as it were.

A Photojournalist Looks Back on the Challenger Space Shuttle Disaster After 30 Years

Today marks the 30th anniversary of the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster. On January 28th, 1986, the NASA Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger broke up 73 into its flight into space, killing the 7 astronauts on board.

Orlando Sentinel photojournalist Red Huber was covering the launch that day. In the 4-minute video above, Huber reflects on the event and shares what he remembers from shooting that fateful assignment.

An Alley in Nepal, Before and After the Earthquake

I was in Nepal exactly six years and three days before the earthquake that devastated the country on Saturday.

Back then, I was photographing for a magazine feature and had spent much of the day in Bhaktapur, a beautiful and ancient city in the Kathmandu Valley.

Witnessing a Raging Wildfire Through the Lens of My Camera

When photographer Jim Stimson and I started our Winter in the Eastern Sierra photography workshop at Mountain Light Gallery we knew the drought conditions would provide a challenge for us to come up with “wintery” scenes for our clients.

A major storm was rolling in and much of California was under flash flood watches. We were under a high wind advisory with rain and snow to follow. A power transmitter was blown down in the strong erratic winds and soon a wildfire was raging out of control.

Bride Thrown from Horse During Photo Shoot

Here's an example in which having a "YOLO" attitude during a photo shoot turned out to be a very bad idea. Photographer Jarrett Hucks was photographing a soon-to-be bride on a beach when a group of equestrians rode by. The client decided that "since you only live once," she wanted a photo of herself riding a horse. What happened next is captured in the video above.

Pictures Recovered From Damaged Cameras Reveal Moments Before Volcano’s Eruption

On September 27th, 2014, Mount Ontake in Japan erupted and began spewing ash. A popular destination for tourists and beginning hikers, several hundred people were reportedly on the volcano at the time. At least 56 of them didn't make it off.

Now, in the aftermath of the disaster, damaged cameras and phones are yielding photos that offer a glimpse into what things were like on the slopes just moments before the rumbling began.

Man Sticks His Camera Out Storm Shelter Hole, Captures View of Tornado Up Close

When the 2013 Moore tornado struck Oklahoma on May 20th, 2013, Charles Gafford III took refuge in a storm shelter. Once inside, he noticed that there was a small gap in the shelter that he could stick his smartphone through. He did, and ended up capturing the footage above that shows what it's like to have an EF5 tornado -- the strongest strength rating assigned -- pass almost directly overhead.

What It Was Like to Capture the Aftermath of the Oklahoma Tornado

In Oklahoma, tornados are a common thing. Every spring they occur and every Oklahoman grows up knowing what they are and the damage they can cause. As a native Oklahoman, I've only seen two tornados in person after chasing them down. Most of the time they do little damage and dissipate fairly quickly. People are usually more worried about damage that comes from the gigantic-sized hail than from tornados.

A Time-Lapse and Footage of the Tornado That Struck Oklahoma

Update on 12/16/21: This video has been removed by its creator.

A devastating tornado struck Moore, Oklahoma on Monday, May 20, 2013. It was reportedly over 2 miles wide at one point, and covered 20 miles during the 40 minutes it was on the ground. The National Weather Service has classified it as at least an EF-4 tornado with winds of at least 166 miles per hour.

NBC affiliate station WMC-TV had a helicopter camera in the sky capturing the whole thing, and released the time-lapse video above showing the storm traveling across the land before finally disappearing back into the clouds.

Wedding Photographer’s Hair Goes Up in Flames As the Bride Walks the Aisle

Wedding photographers are supposed to stealthily document unique moments, not become part of them. Unfortunately, the latter is what photographer Jacki Bruniquel did last month while photographing a wedding in South Africa. As the bride walked down the aisle with her father, a wedding photographer's worst nightmare unfolded for Bruniquel: her head got too close to a burning candle, kindling a small blaze in her hair. In a few short seconds, the entire room was staring and gasping at Bruniquel rather than the bride.

Stunning Photos of a Thick Red Line in the Aftermath of a Toxic Spill

The photograph you see above isn't the result of Photoshop or infrared photography. Captured by Spanish photographer Palíndromo Mészáros, it shows what the landscape of Ajka, Hungary looked like half a year after the Ajka alumina plant accident -- an industrial disaster in which 35 million cubic feet of toxic waste flooded the land to a height of around 6.5 feet. Mészáros lined up the thick red line caused by the sludge with the horizon line to obtain this surreal image.